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Board of Selectmen: 

Seated (1-r) Robert H. Leet, James R. Engel (Chairman), 

Charles J. Wayne 
Standing (1-r) William E. George, William I. Walton 



Cover: Photograph of Choate Bridge by Susan I. Boice 



ANNUAL REPORT 
TOWN OF IPSWICH 

1989 



NOTES 



TOWN OF IPSWICH 
MASSACHUSETTS 



1989 ANNUAL TOWN REPORT 
TABLE OF CONTENTS 



Roster of Town Officials and Committees 2 

April 3, 1989 Annual Town Meeting 5 

Operating Budget 6 

Board of Selectmen 38 

Town Manager 39 

Accounting Department 40 

Animal Control 40 

Assessor's Office 40 

Building Department 41 

Cemeteries/Parks Department 42 

Civil Defense 42 

Commuter Rai 1 Committee 43 

Conservation Commission 44 

Electric Department 45 

Fire Department 45 

Hall -Haskell House Standing Committee 46 

Harbors 46 

Health Department 46 

Sealer of Weights and Measures 47 

Historical Commission 48 

Ipswich Housing Authority 49 

The Ipswich Arts Council 50 

Library 50 

Master Plan Commission 51 

Metropolitan Area Planning Council 52 

Planning Board 53 

Police Department 54 

Public Works Department 55 

Recreation and Youth Department 56 

Shel If i sh Department 57 

School Committee 58 

Superintendent 60 

Paul F. Doyon Memorial School 61 

Winthrop School 63 

Ipswich Middle School 63 

Ipswich High School 64 

Department of Special Services 65 

Town Clerk 66 

Town Counsel 67 

Treasurer/Col lector 68 

Water/Sewer Departments 68 

Whittier Regional Vocational Technical High School 70 

Zoning Board of Appeal s 72 

Town of Ipswich Revenue Sharing Handicapped Regulations 72 

Financial Statements - Fiscal Year Ending June 30, 1989 73 

-1- 



CONSTABLE 
Joyce A. Gysan 



1989 ROSTER OF TOWN OFFICIALS AND COMMITTEES 

ELECTED 

FINANCE COMMITTEE 
1990 E2 Elected At Town Meeting 









Walter J. Pojasek 


1990 


HOUSING AUTHORITY 






George Jewell 


1991 


Walter Ziemlak 


1991 




Constance Surpitski 


1992 


Stanley Eustace 


1990 


03 


Appointed By Moderator 




Sarah S. O'Connor, Ch 


1994 




William Craft, Ch 


1991 


Arthur Weagle 


1993 




Clarence S. Dupray 


1990 


Loretta Dietch/State 


1991 


S 


Alice Shurcliff 
Appointed By Selectmen 


1992 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE 
Jeffrey Simon, Ch 
Cynthia Quinn 
David Pauley 
Margot Sherwood 
Carl Soderland 
Norman Sheppard 
Lawrence E. Seidler 

TOWN MODERATOR 
A. James Grimes 



1992 
1992 
1990 
1991 
1991 
1990 
1990 



1990 



John Markos 
Allen G. Swan 
Lawrence Pszenny 

BOARD OF SELECTMEN 
Thomas A. Elliott 
Robert H. Leet 
James R. Engel 
William I. Walton 
William E. George 



SI ACCOUNTANT 
Barry Boyce 

Ml ASSESSOR 

Frank J. Ragonese 

Ml BUILDING INSPECTOR 
Joseph Ferruzzi 

Ml CEMETERY/PARKS SUPERINTENDENT 
James E. Graffum 

Ml DOG OFFICER/ANIMAL INSPECTOR 
Harry W. Leno, Jr. 

Ml ENGINEER 

James E. Chase 

Ml FIRE CHIEF 

Edwin R. Emerson 

Will ard Maker, Acting Chief 

Ml HARBORMASTER 

Charles D. Surpitski 

Ml HEALTH AGENT 
Domenic Badolato 

Ml LIBRARIAN 
Eleanor Gaunt 

Ml TOWN PLANNER 
Elizabeth Ware 



APPOINTED ADMINISTRATION 

Ml POLICE CHIEF 



1990 
1991 
1992 



1992 
1990 
1990 
1992 
1991 



Charles D. Surpitski 

Ml PUBLIC WORKS DIRECTOR 
Armand T. Michaud 

Ml RECREATION DIRECTOR 
Elizabeth Dorman 

Ml SHELLFISH CONSTABLE 
Philip Kent 

7 SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS 
Richard F. Thompson 

Ml TOWN CLERK 

Isobel N. Coulombe 

Ml TOWN COUNSEL 

Charles C. Dalton 



S TOWN MANAGER 
George E. Howe 

SI TREASURER/COLLECTOR 
Virgi nia M. Cleary 

Ml DEPUTY COLLECTOR 
William Handren 

SI ELECTRIC DEPARTMENT MANAGER 
Donald R. Stone 



-2- 



APPOINTED BOARDS AND COMMITTEES 



CEMETERY & PARKS COMMISSION 





S. Joseph Favalora 


1991 




Nicholas Markos 


1990 




Gordon C. Player 


1992 


M 


CIVIL DEFENSE 






David Clements, Dir 


1990 




John T. Clogston, Asst 


1990 


S 


COMMUTER RAIL COMMITTEE 






Dorcas Rice 


1990 




Vivian Endicott 


1990 




Joseph Carl in 


1990 




Wil liam Varrell , Ch 


1990 




James McC. Hayward 


1990 




Anne Teele 


1990 




Harold B. Kapell 


1990 




William Faissler 


1990 


M6 


CONSERVATION COMMISSION 






Lillian V. North, Ch 


1990 




Robert B. Porter 


1990 




Arthur A. Knight, Jr. 


1990 




Nicholas A. Vontzalides 


1991 




Jim Berry 


1991 




Richard A. Nylen, Jr. 


1992 




William Barton 


1992 


S 


COUNCIL ON AGING 






Winfred Hardy, Ch 


1992 




Gertrude Emery 


1990 




Helen Drenth 


1990 




Rita Poirier 


1991 




Anthony Christopher 


1991 




Ansel B. Clark 


1992 




Jeanne N. Parker 


1992 


S 


FAIR HOUSING COMMITTEE 






George E. Howe, Dir. 


1990 




Tone Kenney 


1990 




Sara O'Connor 


1990 




Marion Middlebrooks 


1990 



GOVERNMENT STUDY COMMITTEE 
Peter J. Dziadose 
Kris Muench 
Kathleen Mersereau 
Carolyn Britt 
James Campbell 

BOARD OF ASSESSORS 
Frank J. Ragonese 
John D. Heaphy 
John Moberger 



1990 
1990 
1990 
1990 
1990 



1990 
1992 
1991 



M6 HISTORICAL COMMISSION 
Mary P. Conley, Ch 
Susan Nelson 
Donald Curiale 
Arthur L. Dioli , Jr. 
William S. Effner 
Ruthanne Rogers 
Richard B. MacKinnon 



08 
08 
S 



1991 
1990 
1990 
1990 
1991 
1992 
1991 



INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT FINANCING 

AUTHORITY 

George E. Howe, Ch 1991 

James C. Lahar 1992 

Loretta Dietch 1990 

Susan C. Hubbard 1993 



IPSWICH ARTS COUNCIL 

Mary Weatherall 

Mary Pollak 

Georgina Jill Traverso 

Harry Zeltzer 

Jon Aaron 

Kristin Ledson 

Paul Soffron 

Kate Kimball 

Michele S. McGrath 

Jane Harold 

Gene Hailson 

Chip Dort 

LIBRARY TRUSTEES 
Crocker Snow, Sr., Ch 
Donald M. Greenough 
Hubert Johnson 
Lawrence Pszenny 
Martha Gil lespie 
Virginia Jackson 
Bette Siegel 
Louise Sweetser 
George R. Gray 

MASTER PLAN COMMISSION 
Carl Gardner 
Charles J. Wayne 
Benjamin Fierro, III 
Patrick J. McNally 
Robert M. McNeil 
James Theodosopoulos 
Douglas Denninger, Ch 
Richard MacKinnon 
Leslie Brooks 
Stephen Miles 



1991 
1991 
1990 
1990 
1990 
1990 
1990 
1990 
1990 
1990 
1990 
1990 



1992 
1990 
1990 
1990 
1991 
1991 
1992 
1992 
1991 



1990 
1990 
1990 
1990 
1990 
1990 
1990 
1990 
1990 
1990 



-3- 



APPOINTED BOARDS AND COMMITTEES 



03 HALL-HASKELL HOUSE COMMITTEE 





Vivian Endicott, Ch 


1990 




Theresa Stephens 


1990 




Helen M. Burr 


1990 




Cathleen R. McGinley 


1990 




Will iam L. Thoen 


1990 




Norman Quint 


1990 


M 


BOARD OF HEALTH 






David Carleton, Ch 


1990 




Kenneth L. Zinn, M.D. 


1991 




Susan C. Hubbard 


1992 


M 


RECREATION COMMISSION 






Jim Prato 


1990 




Bruce Bryant 


1991 




Linda M. Murphy 


1992 




James W. Foley 


1990 




Marcia Ford 


1990 




Lawrence Drown 


1991 




Nicholas Gelsomini 


1992 


S 


REGISTRARS OF VOTERS 






Peter Ross 


1992 




Edmund Traverso 


1990 




Kristian Muench 


1991 


Ml 


Isobel N. Coulombe, Clerk 


1990 


S 


SHELLFISH ADVISORY BOARD 






Thomas Dorman, Ch 


1990 




Melvin A. Bowen 


1990 




Alice H. Thanos 


1990 




Andrew Gianakakis 


1990 




Forrest W. MacGilvary 


1990 




Anthony Christopher 


1990 




Wayne Castonguay 


1990 



S TRUST FUND COMMISSIONERS 
Sturgis P. Papagiotis 



1990 



WATER SUPPLY COMMITTEE 




James Engel , Ch 


1990 


Robert 0. Butcher 


1990 


Scott Greeley 


1990 


Gerald Priestman 


1990 


Leonard Heurlin 


1990 


WATERWAYS ADVISORY COMMITTEE 




George C. Scott, Jr. 


1990 


Gary J. Hamilton, Ch. 


1990 


Marc C. Silverman 


1990 



PLANNING BOARD 

William E. Bingham 1991 

Stanley Bornstein 1992 

Patrick J. McNally 1993 

Kenneth Savoie 1990 

Catherine Lefebvre 1994 

ZONING BOARD OF APPEALS 

James Theodosopoulos, Ch 1992 

David Levesque 1993 

William J. Murphy 1994 

Daniel B. Lunt, Jr. 1990 

Douglas Denninger 1991 
John R. Verani, Associate 1990 

Joseph R. Petranek, " 1990 



M BELL RINGER 
Stanley Eustace 

M GAS INSPECTOR 

A.N.D. Hyde C.S. 

M PARKING CLERK 

William Handren 1990 

M PLUMBING INSPECTOR 

A.N.D. Hyde C.S. 

M ALTERNATE PLUMBING INSPECTOR 

David W. French C.S. 

M SEALER OF WEIGHTS & MEASURES 

Normand J. Bedard 1990 



M WIRING INSPECTOR 
Raymond Budzianowski 



1990 



APPOINTMENT LEGEND 

E Elected 

S Appointed By Board of Selectmen 

M Appointed By Town Manager 

Other 

1 Supervised By Town Manager 

2 Elected At Town Meeting 

3 Appointed By Moderator 

4 General Laws 

5 1976 STM, Article II 

6 Confirmed by Board of Selectmen 

7 Appointed by School Committee 

8 Appointed by Conservation Com. 



-4- 



1989 ANNUAL TOWN MEETING 

ESSEX, ss 

To the Constable of the Town of Ipswich in said County, 

GREETINGS: 

In the name of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, you are hereby directed to 

notify the inhabitants of the Town of Ipswich, qualified to vote in Town 

affairs, to meet at the IPSWICH HIGH SCHOOL, in said Ipswich on MONDAY, THE 

THIRD DAY OF APRIL, 1989, at 7:30 o'clock in the evening, then and there to 

act on the following articles, viz: 

Moderator James Grimes called for a short postponement at 7:30 p.m. as the 

necessary quorum of 200 voters was not present; seconded, voted. At 7:45 he 

called the meeting to order with 278 voters present. The final count was 
449. 

Superintendent of Schools Richard Thompson led the Pledge of Allegiance to 
the Flag. It was moved, seconded and so voted to admit non-voters. The 
moderator asked that speakers limit their remarks to about three minutes. 

Selectmen Chairman Thomas A. Elliott presented retiring Selectman David S. 
Player, Jr., with a plaque for his nine years of faithful service. 

ARTICLE 1 

To fix the salary and compensation of all elected Town Officers. 

Selectman Robert H. Leet moved that the salary and compensation of all 
elected Town officials be approved as presented in the Budget. Seconded. 
Board of Selectmen, Finance Committee recommended. Unanimous voice vote. 

ARTICLE 2 

To choose the following officers, viz: Constable for one (1) year; Moderator 
for one (1) year; two (2) Selectmen for three (3) years; one (1) member of 
the Housing Authority for five (5) years; and two (2) members of the School 
Committee for three (3) years. 

The above officers to be voted on one ballot at their respective polling 
places as follows: Precinct 1--Agawam Village Recreation Hall, County Road; 
Precinct 2--Winthrop School, Central Street; Precinct 3--Ipswich High School, 
High Street; Precinct 4--Whittier Manor Recreation Hall, Caroline Avenue; on 
Monday, April 10, 1989. The polls shall open at 10:00 a.m. and close at 
8:00 p.m.; or to take any other action relative thereto. 

Mr. Player moved. Seconded. Board of Selectmen, Finance Committee recom- 
mended. Unanimous voice vote. 

ARTICLE 3 

To choose one (1) member of the Finance Committee for three (3) years. 

Selectman William E. George moved that the Town elect Constance Surpitski to 
a three-year term on the Finance Committee. Seconded. Board of Selectmen, 
Finance Committee recommended unanimously. Unanimous voice vote. 



-5- 



ARTICLE 4 

To hear and act upon the report of the Finance Committee relative to the 
municipal budget and to raise, appropriate, and transfer money for the 
ensuing year, including the compensation of elected Town Officers; or to take 
any other action relative thereto. 

Finance Committee Chairman William Craft moved that the Town vote to raise 
and appropriate the sum of $7,289,361 for the purposes indicated in the FY90 
Municipal Operating Budget was presented in the Finance Committee Report, 
pages 12-17; and further, for the Municipal Operating Budget of $7,289,361, 
the Town transfer from Available Funds: 

Surplus Revenue (Free Cash) $1,445,239 

Betterments 61,138 

Water Pollution Control 3,270 

Library Aid 5,579 

Overlay Surplus 201,893 

Reserve Fund (45,000) 

Highway Capital Outlay (156,893) 

Cemetery Perpetual Care and Flowers 19,348 

Dirt Pile 22 , 000 

Traffic Signal 12,800 

Library Addition 1,146 

Sewer Survey 35,564 

Linebrook Road (Chapter 90)* 301,000* 

Thus, the total transferred from Available Funds is: $2,108,977 

Leaving a net to be raised and assessed of: $5,180,384 

(*Article 13, 4/6/86 Annual Town Meeting) 

Seconded. Board of 'Selectmen, Finance Committee unanimously recommended. 
Motion carried on a unanimous voice vote. 



003 SELECTMEN: 

Salaries & Wages 

Expenses 

Total 

005 TOWN MANAGER: 
Salaries & Wages 
Expenses 

Labor Consultants 
Capital Outlay 
Total 

009 MODERATOR: 
Salary 
Expenses 
Total 



OPERATING BUDGET 








GENERAL GOVERNMENT 












FY89 * 


FY90 


FY87 


FY87 


Appro- 


Recom- 


Expended 


Expended 


priated 


mended 


$ 13,044 


$ 16,767 


$ 15,839 $ 


16,505 


3,644 


1,754 


5,555 


3,835 


16,688 


18,521 


21,394 


20,340 


$ 83,691 


$ 89,197 


$ 97,682 


$102,787 


17,391 


20,871 


22,367 


23,557 


12,576 


11,308 


5,000 


5,000 





4,458 


13,708 





113,658 


125,834 


138,757 


131,344 


100 


100 


100 


100 








10 


10 


100 


100 


110 


110 



-6- 



OPERATING BUDGET 
GENERAL GOVERNMENT 









FY89 * 


FY90 




FY87 


FY87 


Appro- 


Recom- 




Expended 


Expended 


priated 


mended 


Oil FINANCE COMMITTEE: 










Salaries & Wages 








50 





Expenses 


2,588 


2,475 


2,975 


2,975 


Total 


2,588 


2,475 


3,025 


2,975 


015 ELECTIONS & REGISTRATION: 










Salaries & Wages 


14,242 


8,061 


17,921 


8,851 


Expenses 


6,014 


5,991 


6,211 


6,770 


Total 


20,256 


14,052 


24,132 


15,621 


025 ACCOUNTANT: 










Salaries & Wages 


92,904 


89,679 


97,017 


102,346 


Expenses 


32,421 


25,697 


27,842 


25,638 


Total 


125,325 


115,376 


124,859 


127,984 


029 ASSESSORS: 










Salaries & Wages 


73,339 


78,941 


89,474 


94,564 


Valuation Fee 





114,662 


3,000 


5,200 


Expenses 


8,693 


9,891 


13,325 


11,032 


Capital Outlay 


68 





500 


500 


Total 


82,100 


203,494 


106,299 


111,296 


033 TREASURER/COLLECTOR: 










Salaries & Wages 


86,735 


91,540 


89 , 734 


94,550 


Expenses 


9,302 


8,631 


13,785 


14,185 


Capital Outlay 


1,563 





4,445 


1,600 


Total 


97,600 


100,171 


107,964 


110,335 


039 TOWN CLERK: 










Salaries & Wages 


36,454 


38,734 


42,650 


46,647 


Expenses 


2,088 


2,329 


2,760 


3,070 


Capital Outlay 





5,865 


775 


175 


Total 


38,542 


46,928 


46,185 


49,892 


045 LEGAL DEPARTMENT: 










Salaries & Wages 


10,000 


12,000 


12,000 


12,960 


Town Counsel-Litigation 


20,143 


28,720 


20,000 


28,000 


Special Counsel 











10,000 


Expenses 


2,197 


1,410 


2,580 


2,580 


Total 


32,340 


42,130 


34,580 


53,540 


061 APPEALS BOARD: 










Salaries & Wages 


1,325 


1,012 


2,865 


3,000 


Expenses 


354 


305 


701 


701 


Capital Outlay 














Total 


1,679 


1,317 


3,566 


3,701 



-7- 



063 PLANNING BOARD: 
Salaries & Wages 
Expenses 

Planning Consultants: 

Reimbursable 

General 
Capital Outlay 
Total 

064 MASTER PLAN COMMISSION: 
Salaries & Wages 
Expenses 

Planning Consultants: 
Total 

065 TOWN HALL & ANNEX: 
Salaries & Wages 
Expenses 

Energy Supplies 
Capital Outlay 
Total 

TOTAL GENERAL GOVERNMENT 



101 POLICE DEPARTMENT: 
Salaries & Wages 
Expenses 

Energy Supplies 
Drug Enforcement Fund 
Capital Outlay 
Total 

102 HARBORS: 
Salaries & Wages 
Expenses 
Energy Supplies 
Capital Outlay 
Total 

103 FIRE DEPARTMENT: 
Salaries & Wages 
Training 
Expenses 
Energy Supplies 
Capital Outlay 
Total 







FY89 * 


FY90 


FY87 


FY88 


Appro- 


Recom- 


Expended 


Expended 


priated 


mended 


32,094 


42,006 


45,918 


49,458 


2,397 


2,113 


7,380 


7,930 

















2,780 


8,200 


52,000 








1,837 





34,491 


46,899 


63,335 


109,388 


855 


690 


1,000 


1,000 


76 





1,100- 


1,100 





315 


5,100 


5,100 


931 


1,005 


7,200 


7,200 


16,868 


18,105 


19,871 


21,707 


11,888 


15,625 


16,005 


18,235 


6,294 


5,031 


7,500 


6,750 


3,561 


70,996 


6,744 


2,300 


38,611 


109,757 


50,120 


48,992 


604,909 


828,059 


731,526 


792,718 


PUBLIC SAFETY 








687,919 


741,687 


829,669 


881,896 


20,375 


27,872 


29,111 


30,952 


30,567 


28,700 


32,060 


31,718 











1,000 


27,654 


34,121 


31,230 


175,496 


766,515 


832,380 


922,070 


1,121,062 


11,714 











4,941 


3,397 


4,360 


4,585 


439 


386 


900 


850 


768 


15,463 


1,640 


8,450 


17,862 


19,246 


6,900 


13,885 


421,130 


532,901 


569,921 


637,427 


921 


3,036 


3,000 


2,475 


35,016 


32,304 


50,156 


65,532 


4,047 


4,758 


5,695 


5,270 


12,871 


20,293 


47,310 


210,295 


473,985 


593,292 


676,082 


920,999 



-8- 



109 FORESTRY: 

Salaries & Wages 
Expenses 
Energy Supplies 
Capital Outlay 
Total 

112 SHELLFISH: 
Salaries & Wages 
Expenses 
Consultants 
Energy Supplies 
Capital Outlay 
Total 

113 BUILDING INSPECTOR: 
Salaries & Wages 
Inspection Consultant 
Energy Supplies 
Expenses 

Capital Outlay 
Total 

131 CIVIL DEFENSE: 
Salaries & Wages 
Expenses 
Energy Supplies 
Capital Outlay 
Total 

133 ANIMAL CONTROL: 
Salaries & Wages 
Expenses 
Energy Supplies 
Capital Outlay 
Total 

TOTAL PUBLIC SAFETY: 



301 ADMINISTRATION: 
Salaries & Wages 
Expenses 
Capital Outlay 
Total 

303 HIGHWAY DIVISION: 
Salaries & Wages 
Expenses 
Road Treatment 
Capital Outlay 
Total 







FY89 * 


FY90 


FY87 


FY88 


Appro- 


Recom- 


Expended 


Expended 


priated 


mended 


60,461 


67,500 


77,434 


81,148 


20,889 


17,477 


23,773 


26,018 


2,227 


2,457 


2,825 


2,727 


4,025 


976 


1,000 


15,000 


87,602 


88,410 


105,032 


124,893 


25,651 


27,900 


36,660 


38,122 


792 


440 


1,500 


1,500 


747 


1,911 


2,495 


2,400 


677 


622 


765 


700 





1,375 








27,867 


32,248 


41,420 


42,722 


36,938 


38,787 


42,442 


48,759 











5,000 





332 


600 


360 


3,386 


5,115 


3,496 


3,471 


599 


2,001 


12,416 


540 


40,923 


46,235 


58,954 


58,130 


2,400 


2,400 


3,000 


3,000 


1,946 


1,855 


2,125 


2,125 


23 





75 


75 














4,369 


4,255 


5,200 


5,200 


17,000 


18,250 


19,345 


21,000 


3,891 


2,428 


4,804 


5,015 


467 


639 


700 


700 


820 





8,487 





22,178 


21,317 


33,336 


26,715 


1,441,301 1 


,637,383 


1,848,994 


2,313,606 


PUBLIC WORKS 








44,918 


50,755 


54,956 


58,356 


1,508 


1,718 


2,335 


2,556 


206 


206 








46,632 


52,679 


57,291 


60,912 


139,619 


148,610 


174,456 


186,824 


128,077 


130,913 


151,772 


148,967 


149,995 


278,374 


246,000 


293,000 


7,997 


59,300 


116,325 


184 , 564 


425,688 


617,197 


688,553 


813,355 



-9- 



305 SNOW & ICE CONTROL: 
Salaries & Wages 
Expenses 
Energy Supplies 
Rental 
Total 

309 EQUIPMENT MAINTENANCE: 
Salaries & Wages 
Consultants 
Expenses 
Energy Supplies 
Capital Outlay 
Total 

TOTAL PUBLIC WORKS: 



403 SANITATION CONTRACT: 

Sanitation Composite Contract 
Spring & Fall Cleaning 
Total 

409 SEWER: 

Salaries & Wages 
Expenses 
Energy Supplies 
Capital Outlay 
Total 







FY89 * 


FY90 


FY87 


FY88 


Appro- 


Recom- 


Expended 


Expended 


priated 


mended 


35,750 


34,844 


26.250 


25,000 


79,754 


70,470 


63,500 


64,750 


4,247 


5,292 


5,600 


5,600 


26,949 


26,034 


27,000 


27,000 


146,700 


136,640 


122,350 


122,350 


23,613 


25,381 


27,309 


28,640 





400 








23,300 


29,403 


29,500 


41,060 


6,454 


8,885 


9,940 


10,900 





5,795 


13,500 





53,367 


69,864 


80,249 


80,600 


672,387 


876,380 


948,443 


1,077,217 


SANITATION 








319,500 


342,000 


371,000 


402,000 


17,000 


33,855 


68,350 


56,700 


336,500 


375,855 


439,350 


458,700 


152,609 


165,977 


181,662 


195,757 


158,044 


172,993 


225,429 


203,163 


4,771 


7,872 


10,938 


8,142 


10,914 


6,599 


10,000 





326,338 


353,441 


428,029 


407,062 



TOTAL SANITATION: 



662,838 729,296 
OTHER ENVIRONMENTAL SERVICES 



867,379 865,762 



481 HISTORICAL COMMISSION: 
Salaries & Wages 
Expenses 
Capital Outlay 
Total 

487 CONSERVATION COMMISSION: 
Salaries & Wages 
Expenses 
Capital Outlay 
Total 



TOTAL OTHER ENVIRONMENTAL SERVICES 2,947 






20 


226 


4,991 





15,523 


226 


20,534 


1,200 


1,400 


387 


466 


1,134 





2,721 


1,866 



22,400 



500 

4,025 



4,525 



1,600 

725 

1,175 

3,500 

8,025 



1,000 

9,200 

125 

10,325 





12,650 

1,500 

14,150 

24,475 



-10- 







FY89 * 


FY90 


FY87 


FY88 


Appro- 


Recom- 


Expended 


Expended 


priated 


mended 



HUMAN SERVICES 



501 HEALTH: 

Salaries & Wages 
Expenses 
Emergency Fund 
Capital Outlay 
Total 

531 COUNCIL ON AGING: 
Salaries & Wages 
Expenses 
Total 

551 VETERAN'S BENEFIT: 
Expenses 
Total 

571 CEMETERIES & GROUNDS: 
Salaries & Wages 
Expenses 
Energy Supplies 
Capital Outlay 
Total 

TOTAL HUMAN SERVICES 



54,305 


60,439 


69,672 


77,016 


70,395 


138,789 


306,991 


317,680 











1,000 


1,166 


172 


1,160 





125,866 


199,400 


377,823 


395,696 


7,775 


8,160 


8,556 


9,900 


19,194 


18,671 


20,289 


21,580 


26,969 


26,831 


28,845 


31,480 


55,235 


49,231 


95,000 


60,000 


55,235 


49,231 


95,000 


60,000 


137,392 


154,277 


171,562 


181,932 


18,311 


19,823 


22,105 


22,466 


6,016 


6,997 


7,537 


7,845 


18,442 


19,309 


5,120 


10,525 


180,161 


200,406 


206,324 


222,768 



388,231 



475,868 



707,992 709,944 



CULTURE AND RECREATION 



601 LIBRARY 

Salaries & Wages 
Expenses 
Energy Supplies 
Capital Outlay 
Total 

621 RECREATION AND YOUTH SERVICES: 
Salaries & Wages 
Expenses 
Energy Supplies 
Youth Services 
Capital Outlay 
Total 

TOTAL CULTURE & RECREATION 



123,563 


138,959 


157,323 


178,220 


52,456 


57,561 


66,436 


71,695 


1,245 


1,278 


1,950 


1,500 


18,482 


11,108 


2,236 


450 


195,746 


208,906 


227,945 


251,865 


45,581 


46,870 


58,864 


61,061 


16,874 


17,389 


19,510 


21,925 


446 


549 


706 


600 








5,000 





1,886 


1,074 





22 , 500 


64,787 


65,882 


84,080 


106,086 



260,533 



274,788 



312,025 357,951 



-11- 











FY89 * 


FY90 






FY87 


FY88 


Appro- 


Recom- 






Expended 


Expended 


priated 


mended 






UNCLASSIFIED 








081 


INSURANCE: 












Unemployment 


6,820 


1,317 


5,000 


5,000 




Motor Vehicle 


53,491 


36,295 


18,370 







Workmen's Compensation 


109,516 


62,851 


79,618 


65,406 




Package Insurance 


228,336 


71,527 


96,854 


106,917 




Public Official Bonds 


2,184 


3,536 


1,460 


1,251 




Legal Liability 


34,298 


35,559 


36,700 


36,600 




Total 


434,645 


211,085 


238,002 


215,174 


071 


BENEFITS: 












Military Service Credits 


10,916 


11,138 


15,100 


17,015 




County Retirement System 


525,864 


330,846 


354,773 


406,954 




Health & Life 


281,320 


303,443 


143,185 


136,280 




Medicare 


10,699 


14,971 


17,000 


17,000 




Total 


828,799 


660,398 


530,058 


577,249 


701 


DEBT SERVICE: 












Payment of Principal 


265,000 


65,000 


24,500 


185,000 




Payment of Interest 


10,017 


3,948 


1,076 


4,000 




Interest on Tax Ant. Notes 


9,500 





9,500 


17,829 




Total 


284,517 


68,948 


35,076 


206.829 



091 OFFICE EQUIPMENT: 



5,235 



7,627 



7,500 58,186 



013 RESERVE FUND (Transfers in appropriate budgets in prior years; funded @ 
$45,000 in all years) 

26,761 45,000 



019 AUDIT FEE: 

069 BOND ISSUE COSTS: 

091 POSTAGE: 

TOTAL UNCLASSIFIED: 
TOTAL OPERATING BUDGET: 



52,500 30,250 




12,986 14,350 12,750 15,000 

1,566,182 962,408 902,647 1,147,688 

$5,599,328 $5,806,582 $6,327,031 $7,289,361 



*Note: FY89 reflects Reserve Fund transfers to date. 

ARTICLE 5 

To hear and act upon the reports of the Finance Committee and of the School 
Committee relative to the School Department budget and to raise, appropriate, 
and transfer money for the ensuing year's operations; or to take any other 
action relative thereto. 

School Committee Chairman Jeffrey Simon moved that the Town vote to raise and 
appropriate the sum of $8,370,000 for the School Department Budget for FY90: 



For the School Department Budget 
Transfer from Available Funds: 

Feoffees of the Grammar School 
Net to be raised and assessed: 



,370,000 
4,000 



$8,366,000 



12- 



ARTICLE 6 

To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of money to cover 
the Town's share of the annual operating and debt service expenses of the 
Whittier Regional Vocational Technical High School District; or to take any 
other action relative thereto. 

Whittier School Committee member Eugene Hail son moved that the Town vote to 
raise and appropriate the sum of $115,012 to cover the Town's share of the annual 
operating and debt service expenses of the Whittier Regional Vocational Technical 
High School District. Seconded. Board of Selectmen, Finance Committee recommended, 
Unanimous voice vote. 

ARTICLE 7 

To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of money for the 
current expenses of the Water Division, the same to be paid for by revenues 
of the Water Division during FY90, and to transfer a sum of money from the 
surplus account to water capital outlay and/or debt service; or to take any 
other action relative thereto. 

Selectman James Engel moved that the Town vote to raise and appropriate the sum of 
$1,164,083 for the FY90 expenses of the Water Division. 

For the Water Division $1,164,083 

Transfer from Available Funds 219,883 

Net to be raised and assessed: "J 944,200 

Seconded. Priority in the Water Budget is for upgrading the metering and distri- 
buting systems. Board of Selectmen, Finance Committee recommended unanimously. 
Unanimous voice vote. 

ARTICLE 8 

To see if the Town will vote: (1) to raise and appropriate a sum of money 

and/or transfer from available funds a sum of money to pay unpaid bills 

incurred in previous years and remaining unpaid; and (2) to raise and 
appropriate a sum of money and/or to appropriate a sum of money from the 

Water Division surplus account to pay any Water Division unpaid bills 

incurred in previous years and remaining unpaid; or to take any other action 
relative thereto. 

Mr. Player moved that the Town vote (1) to appropriate the sum of $496.34 to pay 
unpaid bills incurred in previous years and remaining unpaid, viz: 

Pol ice Expense - Doug's Marine $15.90 

Michael S. Gordon, MD 70.00 

Animal Control Expense - Agawam Auto 49.06 

School s Expense - Goldberg Energy Management 144.00 

Dick Blick 23.31 

Fire Expenses - Union Radiology (Jeff French) 17.00 

Beverly Hosp. (Anne Killeen) 70.43 

Emergency Care Physicians of 

Framingham (Jeff French) 50.00 

$496.34; 
and (2) to raise this appropriation by transferring $302.27 from free cash and 
$194.07 from overlay surplus. Seconded. Board of Selectmen, Finance Committee 
recommended. Unanimous voice vote. 

-13- 



ARTICLE 9 

To see it the Town will vote to raise and appropriate or to transfer from 
available funds, sums of money to fund supplements to the Town and School 
Operating Budgets for FY89 and the Water Division Operating Budget for FY89; 
or to take any other action relative thereto. 

Mr. Elliott moved that the Town vote (1) to appropriate the sum of 
$73,049.53 to fund supplements to the FY89 Municipal Operating Budget; viz: 

Police Expense - Peter Foote medical bills $7,839.38 

Fire Expense - MMA Study 5,000.00 

Architects 3,000.00 

Capital - Radio Private Line 11,000.00 

Miscellaneous Finance Expense - Workers' Comp. Ins. 8,000.00 

Water - Interest - SAAN Rollover 3,540.00 

Reserve Fund (Building Inspector Vehicle) 10,600.00 
Building Inspector Expenses - Demolition Expenses 

(Kozeneski property on Agawam Avenue) 9,400.00 

Cemetery Capital Outlay - Replace pickup truck 10,500.00 
Highway Department Capital Outlay - Parking Lot 

Improvements - Vanasse Hangen Brustlin 4,170.20 



$73,049.53; and 

(2) to raise this appropriation by transferring the sum of $73,049.53 from 
free cash. Seconded. Board of Selectmen, Finance Committee recommended. 
Motion carried on voice vote. 

ARTICLE 10 

To see if the Town will vote (1) to authorize the Treasurer, with the appro- 
val of the Board of Selectmen, to borrow money from time to time, in antici- 
pation of the revenue for the financial year beginning July 01, 1989, and 
ending June 30, 1990, in accordance with the provisions of the General Laws, 
Chapter 44, Section 4, as amended, and to renew any note or notes as may be 
given for a period of less than one year, in accordance with the provisions 
of the General Laws, Chapter 44, Section 17, as amended; and (2) to authorize 
the Treasurer, with the approval of the Board of Selectmen, to enter into a 
written agreement with a banking institution for the provision of banking 
services to the Town, in accordance with the provisions of Section 53F of 
Chapter 44 of the General Laws, as amended; or to take any action relative 
thereto. 

Mr. Leet moved that Article 10 be approved as presented in the Warrant for 
the April 3, 1989 Annual Town Meeting. Seconded. Board of Selectmen, 
Finance Committee recommended unanimously. Unanimous voice vote. 

ARTICLE 11 

To see if the Town will vote to accept the provisions of M.G.L. Chapter 59, 
Section 5, Clause 41C for fiscal year 1990; or to take any other action rela- 
tive thereto. 

Mr. Elliott moved that the Town vote to accept the provisions of 
Massachusetts General Laws, Chapter 59, Section 5, Clause 41C, for Fiscal 
Year 1990. Seconded. This provides tax exemptions for over-70 residents 
who have lived here at least 10 years, have owned the property over 5 years 
and have an income of less than $13,000. Board of Selectmen, Finance 
Committee recommended. Unanimous voice vote. 

-14- 



ARTICLE 12 

To see what action the Town will take with regard to the transfer of any 

surplus funds in the Electric Light Department. 

Mr. Engel moved that the Town vote to transfer the sum of $115,900 from the 
Surplus Account of the Electric Department for the purpose of reducing 
taxes. Seconded. Mr. Engel said that the Town gets l/8th of It for each 
kilowatt sold; we pay the lowest electric rates in the State with the excep- 
tion of Belmont. Board of Selectmen, Finance Committee recommended unani- 
mously. Unanimous voice vote. 

ARTICLE 13 

To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of money for the 
purpose of promotion of the Town of Ipswich, an equal sum of money to be made 
available for said purposes from the Chamber of Commerce; or to take any 
other action relative thereto. 

Mr. Leet moved that the Town vote to raise and appropriate the sum of $1,000 
for the purpose of promotion of the Town of Ipswich, an equal sum of money 
to be made available for said purposes from the Chamber of Commerce. 
Seconded. Board of Selectmen, Finance Committee recommended unanimously. 
Motion carried on a voice vote. 

ARTICLE 14 

To see if the Town will vote: (1) to appropriate a sum of money to engage 
engineering services and to acquire any related materiel and/or services for 
the construction and maintenance of roads and bridges under Chapter 90 of the 
General Laws, as amended; (2) to authorize the Board of Selectmen to apply 
for, to accept, and to expend any Federal and/or State grants which may be 
available for the aforementioned purposes; (3) to authorize the Board of 
Selectmen to acquire such easements and/or other interests(s) as may be 
necessary to effectuate said repairs, by purchase, gift, lease, eminent 
domain, or otherwise and to convey such land(s) and/or easements to Essex 
County and authorize the filing of special legislation to help effectuate 
the same; and (4) to determine whether said appropriation shall be raised by 
borrowing, transfer from available funds, or otherwise; or to take any other 
action relative thereto. 

Mr. Player moved (1) that the sum of $107,025 be appropriated to engage 
engineering services and to acquire any related materiel and/or services for 
the construction and maintenance of roads and bridges under Chapter 90 of 
the General Laws, as amended; (2) to authorize the Board of Selectmen to 
apply for, to accept, and to expend any Federal and/or State grants which 
may be available for the aforementioned purposes; (3) to authorize the Board 
of Selectmen to acquire such easements and/or other interest (s) as may be 
necessary to effectuate said repairs, by purchase, gift, lease, eminent 
domain, or otherwise and to convey such land(s) and/or easements to Essex 
County and authorize the filing of special legislation to help effectuate 
the same; and (4) to raise this appropriation, the sum of $80,269 be trans- 
ferred from available funds (Chapter 90) and $26,756 be raised by taxes. 
Seconded. Board of Selectmen, Finance Committee recommended unanimously. 
Unanimous voice vote. 



-15- 



ARTICLE 15 

To see if the Town will vote (1) to appropriate a sum of money to engage 
engineering services and to acquire any related materiel and/or services for 
the repair of town-owned and maintained bridges; (2) to authorize the Board 
of Selectmen to apply for, accept, and expend any Federal and/or State grants 
which may be available for the aforementioned purposes; (3) to authorize the 
Board of Selectmen to acquire such easements and/or other interest(s) as may 
be necessary to effectuate said repairs, by purchase, gift, lease, eminent 
domain, or otherwise; and (4) to determine whether said appropriation shall 
be raised by borrowing, transfer from available funds, or otherwise; or take 
any other action relative thereto. 

Mr. Elliott moved that the Town vote (1) to appropriate the sum of $140,000 
to engage engineering services and to acquire any related materiel and/or 
services for the repair of town-owned and maintained bridges; (2) to 
authorize the Board of Selectmen to apply for, accept, and expend any 
Federal and/or State grants which may be available for the aforementioned 
purposes; (3) to authorize the Board of Selectmen to acquire such easements 
and/or other interest(s) as may be necessary to effectuate said repairs, by 
purchase, gift, lease, eminent domain, or otherwise; and (4) to raise this 
appropriation by the transfer from available funds (Chapter 90) of $140,000, 
viz: Article 15, 4/4/88 Annual Town Meeting $60,000; Article 12, 4/1/85 
Annual Town Meeting $20,000; Article 15, 4/2/84 Annual Town Meeting 
$2,143.60; Article 13, 4/6/86 Annual Town Meeting $576.77; Article 14, 
4/6/87 Annual Town Meeting $57,279.63; total $140,000. Seconded. This 
article is for repair of the Choate Bridge and the Winthrop Street Bridge. 
Board of Selectmen, Finance Committee unanimously recommended. Mary Conley 
spoke on how the Choate Bridge was built and urged that it be repaired the 
same way. Motion carried unanimously. 

ARTICLE 16 

To see if the Town will vote (1) to appropriate a sum of money to survey, 
design, and construct extraordinary repairs to the Ipswich Public Schools and 
to obtain all services and/or materiel incidental thereto; (2) to authorize 
the Board of Selectmen to apply for, accept and expend any Federal, State 
and/or private grants which may be available for the aforementioned purposes; 
and (3) to determine whether said appropriation shall be raised by borrowing, 
transfer from available funds, by taxation, or otherwise; or to take any 
other action relative thereto. 

School Committee member Norman Sheppard moved that the Town vote to raise 
and appropriate the sum of $70,000 to undertake extraordinary repairs to the 
Ipswich Public Schools and to obtain all services and/or materiel incidental 
thereto. Seconded. This is for asbestos removal from the High School, 
Doyon and Winthrop Schools. Board of Selectmen, Finance Committee recom- 
mended unanimously. Unanimous voice vote. 

ARTICLE 17 

To see if the Town will vote (1) to appropriate the sum of $300,000 for 
remodeling, reconstructing and making extraordinary repairs to the Ipswich 
Middle School and obtaining any materiel and/or services necessary and inci- 
dental thereto; and (2) to raise this appropriation, the Treasurer, with the 
approval of the Board of Selectmen, shall be authorized to issue $300,000 in 
bonds or notes under the provisions of Massachusetts General Laws, Chapter 44 



-16- 



Section 7(3A), as amended; (3) that the School Committee be authorized to 
contract for, accept and expend any Federal or State aid available for the 
project; and (4) that the School Committee be authorized to take any other 
action necessary to carry out this project; or to take any other action rela- 
tive thereto. (&y Petition) 

Angelo Perna moved that the Town vote to place on the official ballot for 
the April 10, 1989 elections the following question; "Shall the Town vote 
(1) to appropriate the sum of $300,000 for remodeling, reconstructing and 
making extraordinary repairs to the Ipswich Middle School and obtaining any 
materiel and/or services necessary and incidental thereto; and (2) to raise 
this appropriation, the Treasurer, with the approval of the Board of 
Selectmen, shall be authorized to issue $300,000 in bonds or notes under the 
provisions of Massachusetts General Laws, Chapter 44, Section 7 (3A), as 
amended; (3) that the School Committee be authorized to contract for, accept 
and expend- any federal or State aid available for the project; and (4) that 
the School Committee be authorized to take any other action necessary to 
carry out this project?" Seconded. Mr. Perna then asked that this motion 
be withdrawn; the second was then withdrawn. Motion to withdraw carried on 
a unanimous voice vote. 

ARTICLE 18 

To see if the Town will vote (1) to appropriate a sum of money to survey, 
design, and undertake extraordinary repairs to the Ipswich Public Library, and 
to obtain all services and/or materiel incidental thereto; (2) to authorize 
the Board of Selectmen to apply for, accept and expend any Federal and/or 
State grants which may be available for the aforementioned purposes; and (3) 
to determine whether said appropriation shall be raised by borrowing, by 
transfer from available funds, by taxation, or otherwise; or to take any 
other action relative thereto. 

Mr. Elliott moved that the Town raise and appropriate the sum of $98,000 to 
survey, design and undertake extraordinary repairs to the Ipswich Public 
Library and to obtain all services and/or materiel incidental thereto. 
Seconded. This is to install air conditioning in the Library. Chairman of 
the Library Trustees Crocker Snow urged acceptance. Board of Selectmen 
recommended unanimously; Finance Committee recommended 7-1. Motion carried 
unanimously. 

ARTICLE 19 

To see if the Town will vote (1) to appropriate a sum of money to install 
new and replacement water meters and appurtenances and to obtain any and 
all materiel and services incidental thereto; (2) to authorize the Board of 
Selectmen to apply for, accept and expend any Federal, State, and/or pri- 
vate grants which may be available for the aforementioned purposes; and (3) 
to determine whether said appropriation shall be raised by borrowing under 
the provisions of Massachusetts General Laws, Chapter 44:8(7A), transfer 
from available funds, or otherwise; or to take any action relative thereto. 

Mr. Engel moved that the Town vote (1) to appropriate the sum of $170,000 to 
install new and replacement water meters and appurtenances and to obtain any 
and all materiel and services incidental thereto; (2) to authorize the Board 
of Selectmen to apply for, accept and expend any Federal, State, and/or pri- 
vate grants which may be available for the aforementioned purposes; and (3) to 



-17- 



raise this appropriation by authorizing the Treasurer, with the approval of 
the Board of Selectmen, to issue bonds or serial notes in the sum of 
$170,000 under the provisions of Massachusetts General Laws, Chapter 44, 
Section 8(7A). Seconded. Board of Selectmen, Finance Committee recommended 
unanimously. A two-thirds majority was necessary; a voice vote was 
inconclusive; on a hand count, the motion passed 339-6. 

ARTICLE 20 

To see if the Town will vote (1) to appropriate a sum of money to survey, 
design, and undertake extraordinary repairs to the Town Hall; and (2) to 
determine whether said appropriation shall be raised by borrowing, transfer 
from available funds, by taxation, or otherwise; or to take any other action 
relative thereto. 



Mr. Player moved that this article be postponed indefinitely. 
Unanimous voice vote. 



Seconded. 



ARTICLE 21 

To see if the Town will vote (1) to appropriate a sum of mo 
certain parcel of land situate near the Ipswich River commo 
Carriage House (Assessor's Map 42A, Parcel 135A), or a port 
the purpose of developing affordable housing under the Mass 
Partnership Program and to convey said land to the Ipswich 
(2) to authorize the Board of Selectmen to acquire said Ian 
gift, lease, eminent domain or otherwise; (3) to raise this 
authorizing the Treasurer, with the approval of the Board o 
issue bonds or serial notes under the provisions of Massach 
Laws, Chapter 44, Section 7(3); and (4) to determine whethe 
shall be raised by borrowing, transfer form available funds 
to take any other action relative thereto. (By Petition) 



ney to acquire a 
nly cal led the 
ion thereof, for 
achusetts Housing 
Housing Authority; 
d by purchase. 

appropriation by 
f Selectmen, to 
usetts General 
r said appropriation 
, or otherwise; or 



Mr. Perna moved for indefinite postponement. Seconded. Housing Authority 
Chairman Sara O'Connor stated that they were perking sites on the 12th and 
hoped to have good news soon. David Warner of Dornell Road asked for the 
location, but Mrs. O'Connor refused. Diana Matt felt that there should be 
public hearings to discuss the sites. Motion carried on a voice vote. 

ARTICLE 22 

To hear and act upon reports of the committees and to continue such commit- 
tees as the Town may vote to continue. 

William Varrell asked that the report of the Commuter Rail Committee be 
accepted, and the Committee continued. Seconded. Unanimous voice vote. 

Mrs. Conley asked that the report of the Historic District Study Committee 
be accepted, and the Committee continued. Seconded. Unanimous voice vote. 

Vivian Endicott asked that the report of the Hall -Haskell Committee be 
accepted, and the Committee continued. Seconded. Unanimous voice vote. 

David Pauley asked that the report of the School Building Needs Committee be 
accepted, and the Committee continued. Seconded. Unanimous voice vote. 

Douglas Denninger asked that the report of the Master Plan Commission be 
accepted, and the committee continued. Seconded. Unanimous voice vote. 



-18- 



ARTICLE 23 

To see if the Town will vote to rescind its authorizations to borrow the 
unissued balances of monies appropriated under (1) Article 38 of the April 
02, 1984, Annual Town Meeting (Water Filtration Plant); (2) Article 24 of the 
April 01, 1985, Annual Town Meeting (high school roof repairs); (3) Article 9 
of the October 21, 1985, Special Town Meeting (Heartbreak Hill); and (4) 
under Article 14 of the April 06, 1987, Annual Town Meeting (Chapter 90); or 
to take any other action relative thereto. 

Mr. Leet moved that the Town vote to rescind its authorizations to borrow 
the unissued balances of monies appropriated under (1) Article 38 of the 
April 2, 1984 Annual Town Meeting (Water Filtration Plant); and (2) under 
Article 14 of the April 6, 1987 Annual Town Meeting (Chapter 90). Seconded. 
The amounts involved were (1) $2,305,000 and (2) $215,000. Board of 
Selectmen, Finance Committee unanimously recommended. Unanimous voice vote. 

ARTICLE 24 To see if the Town will vote to amend the Protective Zoning By-Law 
of the Town of Ipswich, "SECTION V. USE REGULATIONS", Subsection D. Table of 
Use Regulations ," under the heading "COMMERCIAL" by deleting the following 
paragraph: 

"Automotive repair or automobile service 

station (not including a junk yard or 

open storage of abandoned automobiles or 

other vehicles) — - — - SPB SPB SPB"; 

and by substituting in lieu thereof the 
fol lowing: 

"Motor vehicle repair and/or motor vehicle 
service station (not including a junk yard 
or open storage of abandoned motor vehicles) — — SPB SPB SPB"; 

or to take any other action relative thereto. 

Mr. Elliott moved that the Town vote to amend the Protective Zoning By-Law 
of the Town of Ipswich as stated. Seconded. Board of Selectmen recommended 
unanimously; Finance Committee, Planning Board recommended. Unanimous voice 
vote. 

ARTICLE 25 

To see if the Town will vote to amend the Protective Zoning By-Law of the 
Town of Ipswich and the Zoning Map of the Town of Ipswich to create an Office 
Park District as follows: 

1. Amend "Section IV. A. Types of Districts" by deleting the words "nine (9)" 
and substituting "ten (10)"; and, amend Section IV. A. further by adding a 
new district: "6. Office Park (OP) District" following the current item 
5, and renumbering the current items 6 through 9 as 7 through 10. 

2. Amend "Section IV. B. Intent of Districts" by adding a new item following 
item 4 as follows: "5. The Office Park district is intended primarily for 
professional, business, and research and development office uses on par- 
cels that may be developed in a manner preserving the natural features and 



-19- 



vistas of the Route One corridor. The district is not served by municipal 

sewerage. Municipal water supply is available only in that portion of the 

district bordering Old Right Road and the access road to Parcel 21, Map 

27A." Further amend this section by renumbering the current items 5 
through 7 as 6 through 8. 

3. Amend the Table of Use Regulations of Section V by adding a new accessory 
use following "Wastewater plant or package wastewater plant or power plant 
(amended 4/6/86)", as follows: "Accessory manufacturing use directly 
related to on-site research and development activity"; and, further amend 
this table by adding the symbol "-" for this use under the RRA, RRB, IR, 
and B Districts, thereby designating that this new accessory use will not 

4. Amend the Table of Use Regulations of Section V by adding a new Office 
Park district to be referred to as "OP" and to head a new column to the 
right of the column headed by "I" (Industrial) district, and by indicating 
the permitted uses for this district in this new column as follows: 

TABLE OF USE REGULATIONS 

PRINCIPAL USE DISTRICT 



RRA RRB IR B I OP (17) 



A. RESIDENTIAL 



1. Single-family detached dwelling 

2. Two-family dwelling 

3. Multi-family dwelling 

4. Tourist home 

5. Dormitory, res. fraternity or sorority 

6. Mobile home for permanent residency 

7. Mobile home for temporary residency 

(9/15/86) SBA (1) 

8. Open Space Preservation Zoning 

B. COMMUNITY FACILITIES 

1. Church, other religious purpose P 

2. Educational purpose which is religious, 

sectarian, denominational, public, or 

non-profit. P 

3. Educational purpose which is operated 

for profit, except nursery school SBA 

4. Private day nursery 

5. Membership club SBA 

6. Town governmental building except 

equipment garage P 

7. Town equipment garage P 

8. Expansion of existing town or non-profit 

cemetery, including any crematory SBA 

9. Town outdoor recreation facility and any 

other outdoor non-commercial recreation 

use such as private boathouses and 

landings SPB (3) 

10. Historical, philanthropic, or charitable 

association or society P 

-20- 



TABLE OF USE REGULATIONS 
PRINCIPAL USE DISTRICT 



RRA RRB IR B I OP (17) 

11. For municipal use only, Power Plant, 

refuse incinerator and sanitary landfill, 

or wastewater treatment facility (4/6/87) SPB 

12. Municipal parking lot or structure P 

13. Street, bridge, vehicular tunnel, or 

railroad lines P 

14. Facilities as needed for essential 

community services P 

15. Private utility overhead transmission 

line, substation or similar facility or 
building 

AGRICULTURE 

1. Garden, orchards, nurseries, and 

silviculture P 

2. Piggeries and mink farms P 

3. Greenhouses and farms including the 

raising, keeping, slaughter, and 
dressing of livestock or other 
farm animals: 

(a) on five (5) acres or more P 

(b) on less than five (5) acres SBA 

4. Sale of farm, horticulture, and 

nursery products, on a wholesale 

or retail basis SBA (4) 

5. The following uses, if commercial: 

kennel, stable, livery stable, 

riding academy, or veterinary 

hospital SBA (5) 

COMMERCIAL 

1. Retail establishment selling princi- 

pally convenience goods including but 
not limited to: food, drugs, and 
proprietary goods 

2. Retail establishment selling general 

merchandise, including but not 
limited to dry goods, apparel and 
accessories, furniture and home 
furnishings, home equipment, small 
wares, and hardware, and including 
discount and limited price variety 
stores 
Eating and drinking places where con- 
sumption is intended primarily to be 
within the building 

4. Establishment selling and/or renting new 

and/or used automobiles, trucks, air- 
craft, boats, motorcyles, and household 
and camping trailers and enclosed repair 
facilities accessory thereto 

5. Establishment selling motor vehicles parts 

and accessories 

-21- 



TABLE OF USE REGULATIONS (CON'T) 
PRINCIPAL USE DISTRICT 



RRA RRB IR " B I OP (17) 



COMMERCIAL (CONT'D) 

6. Motor vehicle repair or motor vehicle service 

station (not including a junkyard or 
open storage of abandoned motor vehicles 
or other vehicles) 

7. Hotels and motels SPB (14) 

8. Conversion of an existing dwelling 

into an inn 

9. Personal and consumer service 

establishment 

10. Funeral establishment 

11. Rest homes, convalescent home, or 

nursing homes for the elderly or 
infirm 

12. Hospital, or medical or dental clinic SBA 

13. Membership club SBA 

14. Miscellaneous professional and business 

offices and services including, but not 

limited to, medical, legal or other 

professional services and finance, 

banking, insurance and real estate 

offices P 

15. Miscellaneous business repair services 

16. Motion picture establishment, indoor only 

17. Other amusement and recreation service, 

indoor only 

18. Country, fishing, tennis, boating, 

golfing or similar club SPB 

19. Commercial parking lot or structure 

including a public garage 

WHOLESALE, TRANSPORTATION, INDUSTRIAL 

1. Removal of sand, gravel, or loam 

2. Newspaper printing and job printing 

3. Processing and treating of raw materials 

not enclosed, including operations 
appurtenant to the removal , such as 
grading, drying, sorting, crushing, 
grinding, milling operations 

4. Research offices or establishments devoted 

to research and development activities SBA 

5. Enclosed manufacturing or processing 

6. Enclosed construction uses including 

materials and equipment storage and 
supplies 

7. Bakery, laundry, or dry cleaning plant 

8. Bus and railroad passenger station 

and other transportation service P 



-22- 



TABLE OF USE REGULATIONS (CON'T) 
PRINCIPAL USE DISTRICT 



9. Wholesale trade, warehousing and distri- 

bution 

10. Open storage of raw materials, finished 

goods, or construction equipment and 
structures for storing such equipment 



RRA RRB IR B I OP (17) 



ACCESSORY USE 

1. Non-habitable solar energy collection 

apparatus P 

2. Home occupation 

3. Private day nursery or kindergarten SBA (2) 

4. Private guesthouse, tool shed, playhouse, 

tennis court, boat house, or other similar 
accessory structure; storage of boats 
and boat trailers; private garage for 
motor vehicles, or more than one 
owned by a non-resident of the premises 

5. Accessory parking lot or structure and 

loading facilities P 

6. Unregistered motor vehicles: 

(a) two (2) or less 

(b) more than two (2) in an enclosed building 

(c) more than two (2) not in an enclosed building 

7. Accessory outside storage clearly 

necessary to the operation and conduct 
of a permitted principal wholesale, 
transportation, industrial and/or 
commercial use, provided: it shall 
be screened from view outside the 
premises 

8. Newsstand, barber shop, dining room 

or cafeteria, and similar accessory 

services primarily for occupants or 

users thereof within a hotel, office, 

industrial building, or hospital SBA (15) 

9. Landfill, dredging, or draining P 

10. Signs P 

11. Gardens, orchards, nurseries, or 

silviculture P 

12. Keeping, raising and breeding of farm 

animals, such as poultry, horses, live- 
stock or other farm animals, or insects 
for use only by residents of the premises: 

(a) on one (1) acre or more P 

(b) on less than one (1) acre SBA 

13. Fine arts instructional programs 

14. In-ground swimming pools P (13) 

15. Wastewater plant or package wastewater 

plant or power plant (amended 4/6/87) SPB 



-23- 



TABLE OF USE REGULATIONS (CON'T) 

PRINCIPAL USE DISTRICT 

RRA RRB IR B I OP (17) 

16. Accessory manufacturing use directly related 

to on-site research and development activity SBA (16) 

5. Amend the Footnotes to Use Regulations of Section V as follows: 

a. To Footnote 4, following the words "... from any street lot line...", substi- 
tute a comma for the period and add "except in the Office Park District, in 
which case the setback shall be one hundred (100) feet from any street line." 

b. Following Footnote 13, add: 

"14. Provided that no more than fifty percent (50%) of the gross floor area 
of a building or buildings within a lot is used for said use and that 
the remaining principal uses of the lot are limited to professional and 
business offices and services or research offices. 

15. Provided that no more than five percent (5%) of the gross floor area of 
a building within a lot is used for said use. 

16. Provided that no more than twenty percent (20%) of the gross floor area 
of a building within a lot is used for said use and that the remaining 
principal uses of the building within the lot and containing the 
accessory manufacturi ng use are research and development activities. 

17. When a Site Plan Review is required per Section X of this by-law 
and a use is subject to Special Permit approval, the Special Permit 
Granting Authority (SPGA) shall be the Planning Board, notwithstanding 
the SPGA designated in the Table of Uses." 

6. Amend Section VI. E. Screening Requirements by: 

a. Adding the words "and Office Park district..." following the words "except the 
Business district..." in the first paragraph of this section; 

b. Adding the words "Except in the Office Park District..." prior to the words 
"By Special Permit..." which words currently begin the second paragraph of this 
section; and 

c. Adding a new final paragraph as follows: 

"In the Office Park district all surface parking shall be screened from the 
street and abutting lots by an evergreen hedge four (4) feet in height and two 
(2) feet in width at the time of planting. Said screening may be located 
within minimum side or rear yards provided that it is not more than five (5) 
feet from the surface parking area. In addition, a landscape and screening 
plan shall be provided for the entire site." 

7. Amend the Table of Dimensional and Density Regulations by adding the new 
Office Park district and the dimensional and density regulations of this 
district after the Industrial District as follows: 

DISTRICT: OFFICE PARK 

USES PERMITTED: Office, Research and 

Development 

MINIMUM LOT AREA (S.F.) 217,800 (5 acres) 

MINIMUM LOT WIDTH (FT.) 400 

MINIMUM LOT FRONTAGE (FT.) 200 

MINIMUM YARDS IN FEET: 

FRONT (1) (7) 100 (12) 

SIDE (2) (7) 50 (12) 

REAR (2) (7) 50 (12) 

MAXIMUM BUILDING AREA (%) 20 

MINIMUM OPEN SPACE (%) 50 (13) 



-24- 



8. Amend the Table of Dimensional and Density Regulations Footnotes by: 

a. Adding to Footnote 1 the words "Except in the Office Park district,..." 
prior to the words "No building in any district... ." 

b. Adding the following new Footnotes: 

"12. The setback from Route One, whether a front, side, or rear yard 
shall be a minimum of one hundred (100) feet. 
13. No more than fifty percent (50%) of the open area shall be 
wetland. " 

9. Amend "Section VILA. Parking Requirements" by adding item 11 as follows: 
"11. For all professional and business offices and services or research 

offices and establishments within the Office Park district except den- 
tists' and doctors' offices, one (1) space for each professional or one 
(1) space for e^ery three hundred (300) square feet of gross floor area, 
whichever is greater. For dentists' and doctors' offices within the 
Office Park district, three spaces for each professional or one (1) space 
for each three hundred (300) square feet of gross floor area, whichever 
is greater." 

10. Amend "Section VII. C. Design and Layout", Item 6, by adding the following after 
the first sentence and prior to the second sentence: "Further, in the Office 
Park district no surface or above grade parking or loading shall be permitted 
from a point equivalent to one-half the average building depth to the front lot 
line. Also, in the Office Park district, in no instance shall any parking or 
loading be allowed in any of the minimum yard requirements." 

11. Amend "Section X.C. General Standards" by adding a new standard following item 7, 
as follows: 

"8. Protection and preservation of existing natural features and vistas;" 
and, further amend this section by renumbering the current item 8 and item 9, 
as items 9 and 10, respectively; 

or to take any other action relative thereto. 

Mr. Denninger moved that the Town vote to amend the Protective Zoning By-Law of 
the Town of Ipswich and the Zoning Map of the Town of Ipswich to create an 
Office Park District as presented in Article 25 of the April 3, 1989 Annual Town 
Meeting Warrant. Seconded. He and Benjamin Fierro explained the amendment for 
the Master Plan Commission. Patrick McNally spoke for the Planning Board, which 
unanimously recommended the article. Mr. Player stated the Board of Selectmen 
were 3-2 against, feeling it is much to restrictive. Mr. Craft stated the 
Finance Committee was 5-4 against. Messrs. Engel and George spoke in favor. 
Speaking against were David Warner, Helen Conary, Matthew Kozacki, Everett 
Hudson, Kristian Muench, James MacDowell, Dolores Glennon, John Madden. William 
Lewis asked that Attorney Thomas Alexander, representing landowners on Route 1. 
be allowed to speak; so voted, and he presented their viewpoint (against the 
article). The question was moved, seconded, voted 280-102 on a hand count. The 
vote on the motion (a 2/3rds majority was necessary) failed 198-187. 



-25- 



ARTICLE 26 

To see if the Town will vote to amend "The Protective Zoning By-Law of the 
Town of Ipswich" by deleting Section XI. D in its entirety and by inserting in 
lieu thereof the following: 

"D. Building Application and Permit Fees . Before a building permit may be 
issued, a fee based on the following schedule shall be paid to the 
Town: 

1. All applications for approval of plans and specifications, for a 
permit to construct or perform work, or for a permit to occupy or 
use any land, structure or building shall be accompanied by an appli- 
cation fee of twenty-five dollars ($25.00). Should the approval or 
permit be granted, said application fee shall be applied to the 
total fee for such approval or permit. In the event that such 
approval or permit is denied, the application fee shall not be 
refunded. 

2. A building permit fee shall be paid for all work over which the Town 
has jurisdiction at the rate of five dollars ($5.00) per One Thousand 
Dollars of estimated value, or any fraction thereof calculated as 

fol lows: 

(a) In any New Residential Building , said estimated value shall be 
calculated at fifty dollars ($50.00) per square foot of total gross 
floor area. 

(b) In any New Commercial or Industrial Building , said estimated 
value shall be calculated at thirty dollars ($30.00) per square foot 
of total gross floor area. 

(c) Actual Costs shall be used for determining the calculation of 
fees for any new building or structure regardless of use should the 
actual costs exceed those values as calculated in (a) or (b) above. 

(d) The value per square foot may be modified by the Building Inspector 
in cases involving reasonably complex construction. The reasonable 
judgment of the Building Inspector regarding cost estimates and values 
shall be final, based on the Building Inspector's reference to 
Marshall's Valuation Service and/or other recognized valuation manuals. 

3. Fees for alterations, remodeling and repairs shall be based on a 
twenty-five dollar ($25.00) minimum, plus a fee based on a rate of 
five dollars ($5.00) per One Thousand Dollars of estimated value, 
or any fraction thereof. The value of alterations, remodeling 

and repairs may be modified by the Building Inspector in cases involving 
more complex construction as authorized by in paragraph 2.(d) above. 

4. Fees for structures (such as tanks, swimming pools and the like) 
shall be based upon a value of Five Dollars ($5.00) per thousand 
dollars of estimated cost, or any fraction thereof, with a twenty-five 
dollar ($25.00) minimum. 



-26- 



5. Fees for moving buildings or for demolition of buildings shall be 
fifty dollars ($50.00) each; fees for demolition of less than a 
complete building shall be twenty-five dollars ($25.00). 

6. Fees for heating stoves shall be twenty-five dollars ($25.00) each. 

7. Fees for signs shall be twenty-five dollars ($25.00) each. 

8. Fees for sheds shall be twenty-five dollars ($25.00) each. 

9. A fee of twenty-five dollars ($25.00) shall be paid before a cer- 
tificate of use or occupancy is issued. 

10. Fees for renewals of building permits shall be fifteen dollars 
($15.00) each. 

11. Treble fees shall be assessed and paid for approvals or permits issued 
for work or use commenced without proper approvals or permits, 
should the Building Inspector determine that such is the fact. 

The reasonable judgment of the Building Inspector regarding assessment 
and imposition of treble fees shall be final. 

12. The Town of shall be exempt from paying a building permit 
fee for any municipal project."; or to take any other action 
relative thereto. 

Mr. Leet moved that the Town vote to amend the Protective Zoning By-Law of the 
Town of Ipswich by deleting SECTION XI. D . in its entirety and by inserting a new 
SECTION XI. D. as presented in Article 26 of the April 3, 1989 Annual Town 
Meeting Warrant, with the following noted changes: 

(a) In paragraph #2, second line, delete the words "five dollars ($5.00)" 
and insert in lieu thereof the words "three dollars ($3.00)"; 

(b) In paragraph #3, third line, delete the words "five dollars ($5.00)" 
and insert in lieu thereof the words "three dollars ($3.00)"; 

(c) In paragraph #4, second line, delete the words "five dollars ($5.00)"; 
and insert in lieu thereof the words "three dollars ($3.00)". 

Seconded. Board of Selectmen, Finance Committee recommended; Planning Board in 
favor of original motion but had not voted on the amendment. Motion carried, 
unanimous voice vote. 



ARTICLE 27 

To see if the Town will vote (1) to accept the provisions of Massachusetts 
General Laws, Chapter 40, Section 21D; and (2) to amend the General By-Laws 
of the Town of Ipswich by inserting a new Chapter XVI entitled "Noncriminal 
Disposition of Certain Violations" as follows: 

" Chapter XVI - Noncriminal Disposition of Certain Violations 

Section 1. Authority : In accordance with the provisions of Massachusetts 
General Law, Chapter 40, Section 21D, as amended, certain violations of the 
following listed by-laws, rules, and/or regulations of Town officials, 



-27- 



boards and/or departments may be enforced pursuant to said Section 21D, as 
an alternative to initiating criminal proceedings. 

Section 2. Enforcement : Noncriminal Disposition, when implemented, shall be 
enforced by the person(s) so designated in Section 4 below. The procedures 
for enforcement shall be in accordance with the provisions of Chapter 40, 
Section 21D. 

Section 3. Penalties: The specific penalties for violation(s) of the 
applicable by-laws, rules or regulations shall be as listed in Section 4 
below. 

Section 4. Applicable By-Laws, Rules, or Regulations: 

Subsection A. Zoning By-Law : Notwithstanding the enforcement and penalties 
prescribed in the Protective Zoning By-Law and the provisions of 
Massachusetts General Law Chapter 40A, the provisions of said By-Law may be 
enforced by the Inspector of Buildings or Local Inspector by noncriminal 
complaint. Each day of violation shall constitute a separate offense. No 
enforcement under this section shall be authorized until the enforcing 
officer has mailed by certified mail or delivered in hand to the offender a 
written notice of violation and thirty (30) days have expired from the date 
of mailing or delivery and no appeal pursuant to Chapter 40A has been timely 
filed, or, if an appeal has been filed, final determination has been made 
favorable to the Town. The penalty for violation(s) shall be as follows: 

1st Offense Warning 

2nd Offense Twenty-Five Dollars ($25.00) 

3rd Offense Fifty Dollars ($50.00) 

4th and each subsequent 

Offense One Hundred Dollars ($100.00) to Three 

Hundred Dollars ($300.00)"; 

or to take any other action relative thereto. 

Mr. George moved that the Town vote (1) to accept the provisions of 
Massachusetts General Laws, Chapter 40, Section 21D; and (2) to amend the 
General By-laws of the Town of Ipswich by inserting a new Chapter XVI entitled 
"Noncriminal Disposition of Certain Violations" as presented in Article 27 of 
the April 3, 1989 Annual Town Meeting. Seconded. Board of Selectmen, Finance 
Committee, Planning Board unanimously in favor. Voice vote was inconclusive. 
Motion carried 157-25 on a hand count (2/3rds majority). 

ARTICLE 28 

To see if the Town will vote to amend the Protective Zoning By-Law of the 
Town of Ipswich, " SECTION III. DEFINITIONS " by inserting a new definition 
following the definition entitled "AREA OF INFLUENCE", viz: "AVERAGE 
FINISHED GRADE: the midpoint or elevational mean determined by adding the 
elevational point of lowest finished grade along a foundation and the eleva- 
tional point of the highest finished grade along a foundation and dividing by 
two. It is expressly not to be determined by use of percentages. 
Artificially lowered grades for the purposes of driveways or walkouts are 
expressly included as a measuring point. Finished grade shall not encroach 



-28- 



within (8) eight inches of the top of the foundation wall as prescribed 
within the Massachusetts State Building Code."; or to take any other action 
relative thereto. 

Mr. Elliott moved that the Town vote to amend the Protective Zoning By-Law of 
the Town of Ipswich, " SECTION III. DEFINITIONS " by inserting a new definition 
following the definition entitled "AREA OF INFLUENCE", viz: AVERAGE FINISHED 
GRADE: The midpoint or elevational mean determined by adding the elevational 
point of the lowest finished grade along a foundation and the elevational point 
of the highest finished grade along a foundation and by dividing by two. It is 
expressly not to be determined by use of percentages. Artificially lowered gra- 
des for the purposes of driveways or walkouts are expressly included as a 
measuring point. Finished grade shall not encroach within the grade clearance 
requirements prescribed in the Massachusetts State Building Code." Seconded. 
Board of Selectmen, Finance Committee unanimously in favor; Planning Board una- 
nimously against. Voice vote was inconclusive; motion failed 50-108 on a hand 
count. 

Mr. Craft moved that the Meeting adjourn until Tuesday, April 4, 1989, at 7:30 
p.m., seconded. So voted. Meeting adjourned at 11:25 p.m. 

After several postponements, the Moderator called the Meeting to order at 8:25 p.m. 
on April 4th with 200 voters present. The final count was 211. It was moved, 
seconded, and voted to admit non-voters. 

ARTICLE 29 

To see if the Town will vote to amend the Protective Zoning By-Law of the 
Town of Ipswich, " SECTION III. DEFINITIONS " by adding to the definition 
"BUILDING", following the third sentence thereof the following: 

"Specifically excluded from the term "building" are (a) A tool and/or garden 
shed which does not exceed (150) one hundred fifty square feet (cumulatively) 
and does not exceed ten feet (10') in height at any point, (b) a swimming 
pool pump house and/or cabana which does not exceed (150) one hundred fifty 
square feet (cumulatively) and does not exceed (10) ten feet in height at any 
point, (c) a screen house and/or gazebo (open or screened) which does not 
exceed (250) two hundred fifty square feet (cumulatively) and does not exceed 
(12) twelve feet in height at any point, (d) a pump or well house for a 
single or two family dwelling which does not exceed (25) twenty-five square 
feet in area and does not exceed (8) eight feet at any point, (e) a pump 
house, fixed equipment room, or roofed vault which is accessory to the main- 
tenance and operation of any permitted "essential community services" and is 
not designed or intended to be used for human occupancy or storage of por- 
table equipment, supplies, vehicles and portable machinery; (f) all of the above (a 
through e) for the purposes of this by-law shall be considered "structures"; 
(g) none of the above (a through e) shall at any time be used for the shelter 
or harborage of animals that would otherwise be sheltered in a building or 
structure that would normally be termed a coop, cage, pen or barn, etc."; or 
to take any other action relative thereto. 

Mr. Engel moved that the Town vote to amend the Protective Zoning By-Law of the 
Town of Ipswich " SECTION III. DEFINITIONS " by adding to the definition 
"BUILDING", following the third sentence thereof, those words as set forth in 
Article 29 of the Warrant for the April 3, 1989 Annual Town Meeting. Seconded. 
Board of Selectmen, Finance Committee unanimously recommended. Planning Board 



-29- 



did not recommend; felt buildings could be put on the lot line. Carl Gardner 
spoke against the article and moved for indefinite postponement. Seconded. 
Motion failed to carry. On the main motion, a two-thirds majority was needed; 
the motion failed 87-73. 

ARTICLE 30 

To see if the Town will vote to amend the Protective Zoning By-Law of the 
Town of Ipswich, " SECTION III. DEFINITIONS ", (1) by inserting after the 
definition "RECHARGE AREAS", the following new term: "RETAIL SALES: The 
furnishing of goods and/or merchandise to the end user or consumer for per- 
sonal use or for business use."; and (2) by inserting after the definition 
"USE, PRINCIPAL", the following: "WHOLESALE TRADE: The furnishing of goods 
or merchandise to a user or purchaser who is not the end user or consumer of 
the item itself, regardless of whether said goods or merchandise are sold or 
billed individually or as part of a contracted service."; or to take any 
other action relative thereto. 

Mr. Player moved that the Town vote to amend the Protective Zoning By-law of the 
Town of Ipswich " SECTION III. DEFINITIONS" (1) by inserting after the definition 
"RECHARGE AREAS", the following new term: "RETAIL SALES: The furnishing of 
goods and/or merchandise to the end user or consumer for personal use or for 
business use."; and (2) by inserting after the definition "USE, PRINCIPAL", the 
following: "WHOLESALE TRADE: The furnishing of goods or merchandise to a user 
or purchaser who is not the end user or consumer of the item itself, regardless 
of whether said goods or merchandise are sold or billed individually or as part 
of a contracted service." Seconded. Board of Selectmen recommended 3-2; 
Finance Committee unanimously recommended. Voice vote was inconclusive; motion 
failed 40-118 on a hand count. 

ARTICLE 31 

To see if the Town will vote to amend the Protective Zoning By-Law of the 
Town of Ipswich, "SECTION III. DEFINITIONS", by deleting the fourth sentence 
of the definition "STORY" and by inserting in lieu thereof the following: 
"An attic which has a ceiling area measured at a height of seven and one- 
third (7 1/3) feet or more above the attic floor which is not less than one- 
third (1/3) the area of the floor area of the floor directly below shall be 
deemed a story, finished or unfinished, whether or not accessible. An attic 
of less height and area than 7 1/3 feet shall not be deemed to be a "STORY". 
(See Diagram 4); and by entitling Diagram 4 as follows: "Building section 
with a basement that is deemed to be a story and with an attic that is not 
deemed to be a story".; or to take any other action relative thereto. 

Mr. George moved that the Town of Ipswich vote to amend the Protective Zoning 
By-law of the Town of Ipswich " SECTION III. DEFINITIONS ". Seconded. Board of 
Selectmen 4-1 in favor, Finance Committee 6-3 against; Planning Board in favor. 
Mr. Ferruzzi stated that this would bring in line with the State Building Code. 
Voice vote was inconclusive; motion failed 111-60 on a hand count. 

ARTICLE 32 

To see if the Town will vote to amend the Protective Zoning By-Law of the 
Town of Ipswich, " SECTION XI. ADMINSTRATION ", by adding a new Section "P" 
thereto as follows! "P. Applicability of Amendments to Outstanding Building 
Permits or Special Permits : as prescribed in Section 6 of Chapter 40A of the 
General Laws, construction or operations under a building or special permit 
shall conform to any subsequent amendment of the by-law unless the use or 



-30- 



construction is commenced within a period of not more than six months after 
the issuance of the permit and in cases involving construction, unless such 
construction is continued through to completion as continuously and expeditiously 
as is reasonable. Site work shall not be deemed 'commencement of construction'; 
the actual laying of footings and foundations is 'commencement'"; or to take 
any other action relative thereto. 

Mr. Leet moved that the Town vote to amend the Protective Zoning By of the Town 
of Ipswich "SECTION XI. ADMINISTRATION" as stated. Seconded. Board of 
Selectmen 4-1, Finance Committee, Planning Board unanimously recommended. Carl 
Gardner asked to amend the motion from six months to twelve months. Town Counsel 
stated that Chapter 40A, Section 6, said six months, therefore the amendment is 
illegal. Motion carried unanimously on a voice vote. 

ARTICLE 33 

To see if the Town will vote to amend the Protective Zoning By-Law of the 
Town of Ipswich, " SECTION IX. SPECIAL REGULATIONS ", "A. Open Space 
Preservation Zoning .", by adding to paragraph 7 thereof the following new 
subparagraph: "7.c. The placement of accessory buildings shall be subject to 
the provisions of SECTION VI. F. of this by-law except that, subject to the 
setbacks provided in Sections 7. a. and 7.b. above, accessory buildings may be 
placed in the rear, side, or front yard."; or to take any other action rela- 
tive thereto. 

Mr. Player moved that the Town vote to amend the Protective Zoning By-law of the 
Town of Ipswich " SECTION IX. SPECIAL REGULATIONS " as stated. Seconded. Board 
of Selectmen, Finance Committee, Planning Board recommended unanimously. 
Unanimous voice vote. 

ARTICLE 34 

To see if the Town will vote to amend the General By-Laws of the Town of 
Ipswich "CHAPTER XV MISCELLANEOUS PROVISIONS FOR PUBLIC ORDER AND SAFETY," 
" Section 12. Subsurface Storage of Materials ", by deleting the same in its 
entirety and by redesignating "Section 13. Mandatory Metering of 
Non-Seasonal Water Services " as " Section 12. Mandatory Metering of 
Non-Seasonal Water Services "; or to take any other action relative thereto. 

Mr. Engel moved that the Town vote to amend the General By-laws of the Town of 
Ipswich "CHAPTER XV. MISCELLANEOUS PROVISIONS FOR PUBLIC ORDER AND SAFETY" as 
stated. Seconded. The original Section 12 is being deleted because State regu- 
lations are now stricter than the Town's. Board of Selectmen, Finance Committee 
unanimously recommended. Unanimous voice vote. 

ARTICLE 35 

To see if the Town will vote to designate as scenic roads under the provisions 
of Massachusetts General Laws, Chapter 40, Section 15C, the following roads: 
East Street #2; Old Right Road from the Newburyport Turnpike to the Topsfield 
town line; and Gravelly Brook Road; or to take any other action relative thereto. 

Mr. Bingham moved that the Town vote to designate as scenic roads under provi- 
sions of Massachusetts General Laws, Chapter 40, Section 15C, the following 
roads: East Street #2; Old Right Road from Newburyport Turnpike to the 
Topsfield town line; and Gravelly Brook Road. Seconded. Board of Selectmen, 
Finance Committee, Planning Board recommended unanimously. Motion carried on a 
voice vote. 

-31- 



ARTICLE 36 

To see if the Town will vote to petition the General Court to adopt special 
legislation to allow all landowners in Ipswich to shoot deer on their land, and 
to contract with licensed hunters to do so, in order to protect their families 
from being bitten by deer ticks which are transmitting Lyme disease to a degree 
that poses a serious threat to the public health; such shooting may take place 
at times other than the deer hunting season, and shall be governed by regula- 
tions of the Division of Fisheries and Wildlife of the Commonwealth; and such 
permission shall remain in effect until the Commissioner of Public Health of 
the Commonwealth or the Board of Health of Ipswich decides that the public 
health menace has abated; or to take any other action relative thereto. (By 
Petition) 

Alice Shurcliff moved that the Town vote to petition the General Court as set 
forth in Article 36 of the Warrant for the April 3, 1989 Annual Town Meeting. 
Seconded. Board of Selectmen 4-1 in favor, Finance Committee unanimously. 
Barbara Ostberg, speaking for the League of Women Voters, urged acceptance, 
saying that Ipswich does have a large problem with the Lyme Tick Disease. Rex 
Bradford, agreeing that there is a problem, opposed the article because of fear 
that reckless hunters might shoot people or dogs, and because he doesn't feel it 
would be effective. David Scudder spoke in favor. The motion carried on a 
voice vote. 

ARTICLE 37 

To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate the sum of $22,500 to 
purchase replacement swings and safety signage for all Ipswich parks, and to 
purchase new playground equipment and surface materials for the Great Neck Park; 
or to take any other action relative thereto. (By Petition) 

Mr. Player moved for indefinite postponement. Seconded. Unanimous voice vote. 

ARTICLE 38 

To see if the Town will vote to accept a roadway and utility easement across 
land of the First National Bank of Ipswich in the area of Hammatt Street (the 
"Municipal Parking Lot", Assessor's Map 42A, Parcels 208 and 209 as set forth 
in an easement document executed September 22, 1988, a copy of which is on 
file in the office of the Town Clerk and in the possession of the Town 
Moderator; or to take any other action relative thereto. 

Mr. Player moved that the Town vote to accept a roadway and utility easement 
across land of the First National Bank of Ipswich in the area of Hammatt Street 
(the "Municipal Parking Lot", Assessor's Map 42A, Parcels 208 and 209). as set 
forth in an easement document executed September 22, 1988, a copy of which is on 
file in the office of the Town Clerk and in the possession of the Town 
Moderator. Seconded. Board of Selectmen, Finance Committee recommended unani- 
mously. Unanimous voice vote. 

ARTICLE 39 

To see if the Town will vote (1) to acquire for roadway and all utility pur- 
poses easement interests in two parcels of land (Assessors Map 30A, Parcel 23A; 
and Assessor's Map 30A, Parcel 26F) both in the area of Mitchell Road and Avery 
Street described respectively as follows: " Utility Easement Taking - TEDFORD 
30A/23A - Beginning at a point on the easterly layout line of Avery Street; 



-32- 



thence leaving said layout line and crossing land of James L. Tedford, Jr., 
Trustee of JLT Realty Trust S29-21-15E, 75.17 feet, thence S35-40-30E, 53.23 
feet; thence S36-23-05E, 213.69 to a point on the property line between said 
Tedford and Peter A. Maistrellis, Trustee of the M&M Realty Trust; thence 
following said property line between Tedford & Maistrellis, S53-36-55W, , 6.00 
feet to another point on the aforesaid easterly layout line of Avery Street; 
thence following said layout line N36-23-05W, 213.72 feet; thence N35-40-30W, 
66.38 feet; thence by a curve to the right of 140.00 feet radius, 63.77 feet to 
the point of beginning; all as shown on a plan entitled "Plan of Utility 
Easements & Drainage Betterments for the Town of Ipswich, Scale 1" = 40', March 
1989" and stamped by James E. Chase, Registered Land surveyor and containing 
2072 square feet." ; and " Utility Easement Taking - PERKINS 30A/26F - Beginning 
at a point marking the intersection of the northwesterly end of the layout of 
Avery Street and the southeasterly layout line of Mitchell Road; thence 
following the southwesterly layout line of Avery Street, S35-40-30E, 32.23 
feet; thence leaving said layout line of Avery Street and crossing land of 
Timothy S. Perkins, Trustee of the A.L.P. Realty Trust by a curve to the left 
of 35.00 feet radius, 52.10 feet to a point on the southeasterly layout line of 
said Mitchell Road; thence following said Mitchell Road layout line N59-02-36E, 
32.23 feet to the point of beginning; all as shown on a plan entitled "Plan of 
Utility Easements & Drainage Betterments for the Town of Ipswich, Scale 1" = 
40', March 1989" and stamped by James E. Chase, Registered Land Surveyor and 
containing 216 square feet." ; (2) to authorize the Board of Selectmen to 
acquire said easements interests by purchase, gift, lease, eminent domain, or 
otherwise; (3) to raise and appropriate a sum of money for appraisals, land 
damages, engineering and other services incidental thereto; and (4) to lay out 
a portion of Avery Street, described as follows: Layout of a Portion of Avery 
Street - Beginning at a point marking the intersection of the northwesterly end 
of the hereinafter described layout of Avery Street and the southeasterly layout 
line of Mitchell Road; thence following said northwesterly end and 
southeasterly layout line N48-10-30E, 124.76 feet; thence leaving said end and 
said layout line and following the easterly layout line of the hereinafter 
described layout for Avery Street by a curve to the left of 140.00 feet radius, 
173.09 feet; thence S35-40-30E, 66.38 feet; thence S36-23-05E, 321.37 feet; 
thence S32-43-34E, 161.58 feet; thence leaving said easterly layout of said 
Avery Street and following the southeasterly end of the herein described por- 
tion of Avery Street S57-16-26W, 30.00 feet; thence leaving said end and 
following the westerly layout line of the herein described layout for Avery 
Street and the northerly end of the layout for Dornell Road N32-43-34W, 80.02 
feet; thence leaving said northerly end of Dornell Road and still following 
said westerly layout line for Avery Street N32-43-34W, 80.60 feet, to a drill 
hole in a stone bound; thence N36-23-05W, 320.60 feet, to a drill hole in a 
concrete bound; thence N35-40-30W, 185.47 feet to the point of beginning; all 
as shown on a plan entitled "Layout Plan for a Portion of Avery Street, 
Ipswich, Massachusetts, Scale 1"=40 ' , March 1989" and stamped by James E. 
Chase, Registered Land Surveyor. 

Mr. George moved that the Town will vote (1) to acquire for roadway and all uti- 
lity purposes easement interests in two parcels of land (Assessor's Map 30A, 
Parcel 23A and Assessor's Map 30A, Parcel 26F) both in the area of Mitchell Road 
and Avery Street, with metes and bounds as set forth in Article 39 of the April 
3, 1989 Annual Town Meeting Warrant; (2) to authorize the Board of Selectmen to 
acquire said easements by purchase, gift, lease, eminent domain, or otherwise; 
(3) to raise and appropriate the sum of $2,000 for appraisals, land damages, 



-33- 



engineering and other services incidental thereto; and (4) to lay out a portion 
of Avery Street as described in Article 39 of the April 3, 1989 Annual Town 
Meeting Warrant. Seconded. Board of Selectmen, Finance Committee, Planning 
Board recommended unanimously. Unanimous voice vote. 

ARTICLE 40 

To see if the Town will vote to authorize the conveyance of a sewer ease- 
ment on land of the Town used for School purposes, in the area of High Street 
(Assessor's Map 30B, Parcel 6), to the Town of Ipswich, being described as 
follows: Sewer Easement Taking - Town of Ipswich School Department - Beginning 
at an iron bolt on the westerly State highway layout line for High Street (Route 
1A/133), said bolt also marking the property corner between land of the Town of 
Ipswich and Roger W. Foster, Trustee of the Foster Way Realty Trust; thence 
following said/westerly State highway layout line N39-33-10W, 625.00 feet; 
thence leaving said layout line and crossing land of the Town of Ipswich under 
the jurisdict/ion of the Ipswich School Department S50-26-50W, 30.00 feet; thence 
S39-33-10E, (?22.45 feet to another point on the property line of the aforesaid 
Foster Way Realty Trust; thence following the property line between said Foster 
Way Realty Trust and the said Town of Ipswich N55-18-30E, 30.11 feet to the 
point of beginning; all as shown on a plan entitled "Plan of Sewer Easement for 
the Town of Ipswich, Massachusetts, Over Land Under the Jurisdiction of the 
Ipswich School Department, Scale 1"=40', March 1989"; stamped by James E. Chase, 
Registered Land Surveyor and containing 18,712 square feet; or to take any other 
action relative thereto. 

Mr. Engel moved that the Town vote to authorize the conveyance of an all utility 
easement on land of the Town used for School purposes, in the area of High 
Street (Assessor's Map 30B, Parcel 6), to the Town of Ipswich, as described in 
Article 40 of the April 3, 1989 Annual Town Meeting Warrant. Seconded. Board 
of Selectmen, Finance Committee recommended unanimously; School Committee sup- 
ported the article but had concerns about safety when construction begins. Mr. 
Howe said digging would be between tennis court and sidewalk and should not 
affect school activities. Carl Gardner asked the cost; Mr. Howe said approxima- 
tely $20,000. Mr. Dalton said Town is buying backland, which is going to be 
tied into sewer; Angelo Perna urged acceptance. Motion carried unanimously on a 
voice vote. 

ARTICLE 41 

To see if the Town will vote to amend the General By-Laws of the Town of 

Ipswich, Chapter XV, Section 4, (1) by re-designating present "Section 4(F)" 

as new "Section 4 (G)", and (2) by adding a new Section "4(F)", 

as follows: 

"4(F) No person shall operate any craft, vehicle, boat, and/or all- 
terrain vehicle (ATV) with any outboard motor, inboard motor, and/or engine 
of any type whatsoever unless such motor and/or engine is equipped with an 
adequately muffled exhaust. No person shall use any siren, noise producing 
and/or noise-amplifying instrument on any craft, vehicle, boat, and/or ATV 
in such manner that the peace and good order of any neighborhood is 
disturbed. Provided, however, that nothing in this By-law shall be 
construed to prohibit the use of whistles, bells and/or horns as signals as 
required by any State or Federal law for the safe navigation of motorboats 
or vessels. In addition, no craft, vehicle, boat, and/or ATV shall be 
operated in the Town which produces a sound pressure level of more than 



-34- 



seventy-eight decibels. Sound pressure levels in decibels shall be measured 
on the "A" scale of a sound level meter approved by the Commonwealth's 
director of the Division of Marine and Recreational Vehicles. Measurements 
shall be made of overall vehicle noise at maximum speed at fifty feet in 
accordance with test procedure SAE J192 of the Society of Automotive 
Engineers, or in accordance with such other test procedure for measurement 
of sound pressure levels as the Commonwealth's registrar of motor vehicles 
may adopt."; or to take any other action relative thereto. 

Mr. Leet moved that the Town vote to amend the General By-laws of the Town of 
Ipswich, Chapter XV, Section 4, as stated. Seconded. Board of Selectmen recom- 
mended, Finance Committee recommended. Motion carried on a voice vote. 

Philip McCarthy, Old Right Road, at this point requested reconsideration of 
Article 25, as everybody who wished to speak the night before was not able to. 
The Moderator ruled there was not sufficient grounds for reconsideration. Seven 
voters stood to protest his ruling. The vote was 51-129 against recon- 
sideration. The motion to reconsider was withdrawn 

ARTICLE 42 

To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen to sell and 
convey to the Ipswich Housing Authority for a sum of money the so-called 
Spenser lot (Assessor's Map 31A, Parcel 3) situate at the end of the layout 
of Spring Street, for the development of low income family housing; or to 
take any other action relative thereto. 

Mr. George moved for indefinite postponement. Seconded. Motion carried on 
voice vote. 

ARTICLE 43 

To see if the Town will vote to convey to the Ipswich Conservation Commission 
the so-called Spenser Lot (Assessor's Map 31A, Parcel 3) situate at the end 
of the layout of Spring Street, to hold said property for conservation pur- 
poses pursuant to its authority under Massachusetts General Laws Chapter 40, 
Section 8C; or to take any other action relative thereto. (By Petition) 

Harry Howarth moved that the Town vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen to 
convey to the Ipswich Conservation Commission all or a part of the so-called 
Spenser Lot (Assessor's Map 31A, Parcel 3) for the sum of one dollar ($1.00) 
situate at the end of the layout of Spring Street, to hold said property for 
conservation purposes pursuant to its authority under Massachusetts General Law, 
Chapter 40, Section 8C. Seconded. Board of Selectmen 3-2 in favor, Finance 
Committee unanimously recommended. Mrs. O'Connor stated that the Housing 
Authority was no longer interested in that property. With a two/thirds vote 
necessary, the motion carried on a hand count of 155-18. 

ARTICLE 44 

To see if the Town will vote to amend the General By-Law of the Town of 
Ipswich, "CHAPTER XV MISCELLANEOUS PROVISIONS FOR PUBLIC ORDER AND SAFETY" 
by inserting a new Section 13 as follows: 

"Section 13. Automatic Sprinkler Systems Required in Certain Buildings; 
Exceptions; Alternative Fire Suppressant Systems 

(a) Every building of more than seventy-five hundred gross square feet in 
floor area or every addition of more than seventy-five hundred gross 



-35- 



square feet in floor area shall be protected throughout with an ade- 
quate system of automatic sprinklers in accordance with the provisions 
of the state building code; provided, however, that in the case of said 
addition, such an adequate system of automatic sprinklers shall be 
installed in said addition only. No such sprinkler system shall be 
required unless sufficient water and water pressure exists. For pur- 
poses of this section, the gross square feet of a building or addition 
shall include the sum total of the floor areas for all floor levels, 
basements and sub-basements, measured from outside walls, irrespective 
of the existence of interior fire resistive walls, floors and ceilings. 

(b) In such buildings or additions, or in certain areas of such buildings 
or additions, where the discharge of water would be an actual danger in 
the event of fire, the fire chief shall permit the installation of such 
other fire suppressant systems as are prescribed by the state building 
code in lieu of automatic sprinklers. Automatic suppressant or 
sprinkler systems shall not be required in rooms or areas of a 
telephone central office equipment building when such rooms or areas 
are protected with an automatic fire alarm system. Sprinkler systems 
shall not be required in a one story building having a fire resistance 
rating as prescribed in the state building code that is used solely for 
offices, provided the building is protected by an automatic fire alarm 
system. Sprinkler systems shall not be required in open-air parking 
structures, defined as: buildings, structures, or portions thereof, 
used for parking motor vehicles and having not less than twenty-five 
percent of the total wall area open to atmosphere at each level, uti- 
lizing at least two sides of the structure. This section shall not 
apply to buildings or additions used for residential purposes. 

(c) The fire chief shall enforce the provisions of this section." ; or to 
take any other action relative thereto. 

Mr. Elliott moved that the Town vote to amend the General By-laws of the Town of 
Ipswich " CHAPTER XV. MISCELLANEOUS PROVISIONS FOR PUBLIC ORDER AND SAFETY" as 
stated. Seconded. Board of Selectmen, Finance Committee recommended unani- 
mously. Carl Gardner felt that the original article had been substantially 
changed. Town Counsel said the motion was legal; the change was not that much. 
Dennis Durrell of the Fire Department spoke on the motion. Carried on a voice 
vote. 

ARTICLE 45 

To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of money to be 

placed in the Conservation Fund; or to take any other action relative 

thereto. 

Mr. George moved that the Town vote to raise and appropriate the sum of $5,000 
to be placed in the Conservation Fund. Seconded. The Board of Selectmen had 
borrowed $5,000 from the Conservation Fund to purchase the Hicken land; this is 
repayment. Unanimous voice vote. 

ARTICLE 46 

To see if the Town will vote to accept the provisions of M.G.L. Chapter 60, 
Section 3C, establishing a local scholarship fund, as inserted by Section 3 
of Chapter 712, Acts of 1987; or to take any other action relative thereto. 

School Committee member Lawrence Seidler moved that the Town vote to accept the 
provisions of Massachusetts General Laws, Chapter 60, Section 3C, establishing a 
local scholarship fund, as inserted by Section 3 of Chapter 712, Acts of 1987. 

-36- 



Seconded. Board of Selectmen recommended 3-2, Finance Committee 8-1 recom- 
mended. Mrs. Ostberg asked how recipients are chosen. The Board of Selectmen 
will appoint a committee of five, one of whom will be the Superintendent of 
Schools. Motion carried on a unanimous voice vote. 

ARTICLE 47 

To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of money to be 

placed in the stabilization fund; or to take any other action relative 

thereto. 

Mr. Engel moved that the Town vote to raise a appropriate the sum of $65,000 to 
be placed in the Stabilization Fund. Seconded. Board of Selectmen recommend 
unanimously. Finance Committee 5-4 against, did not think such a small sum 
would help much. School Committee recommended. After a rather lengthy 
discussion, the question was moved, seconded, so voted. Motion carried 94-73 
on a hand count. 

The 1989 Annual Town Meeting was adjourned at 10:45 p.m. 

And you are directed to serve this Warrant by posting up attested copies 
thereof at the Post Office and at each of the meeting houses in the Town, 
and by publication at least seven days prior to the time for holding said 
meeting in a newspaper published in, or having a general circulation in, 
the Town of Ipswich. 

Given unto our hands this 20th day of March in the year of our Lord, One 
Thousand Nine Hundred and Eighty-nine. 

TOWN OF IPSWICH 
BOARD OF SELECTMEN 

Thomas A. Elliott, Chairman 
James R. Engel 
William E. George 
Robert H. Leet 
David S. Player, Jr. 



■37- 



•k-kieieklrfck 

BOARD OF SELECTMEN 
James R. Engel , Chairman 

Calendar year 1989 was a year of changes in the makeup of the Board of Selectmen 
After nine years, David S. Player, Jr. completed his last year with the Board in 
April. Thomas Elliott was returned to the Board in the April elections along 
with newcomer William Walton. Following a change in personal circumstances, 
Mr. Elliott resigned from the Board late in the year. His replacement would be 
determined at a special election held in early 1990. 

To some extent, this year was a watershed year. It was the last year in which 
the budget process could be completed without being severely constrained by the 
tax limiting statute familiarly known as Proposition 2i. Finalization of the 
fiscal 1990 budget during early 1989 tested the limits of Proposition 2h; ini- 
tialization of the FY91 budget process dealt with the virtual inevitability of 
overrides to Proposition 2\ or drastic curtailment of services. The rapidity 
with which this process evolved was, of course, aggravated by the fiscal 
distress of the Commonwealth which is expected to continue well into next year. 

As Water, Sewer and Electric Commissioners a number of important issues came 
before the Board during 1989. 

With pleasure it is noted that the water treatment plant has passed its first 
anniversary of operation with most expectations having been met and, gratefully, 
no major deviations from the financial plan that was anticipated relative to 
its startup and operation. Special note is made of the department staff who 
contributed to this effort. Planning for a number of major capital projects has 
been an ongoing activity with the Commissioners. Among these projects are a 
meter replacement program, preparation for a new standpipe, distribution system 
rehabilitation and/or replacement, and a facility to house Water Department per- 
sonnel and equipment. 

Although the sewerage treatment plant continues to function smoothly and pro- 
fessionally, the issue of sludge disposal remains a major problem. Progress has 
been made in the permitting process which will ultimately allow for the disposal 
of sludge in an ecologically safe and affordable way using biological waste 
treatment (the so-called reed system). The Commissioners also reviewed the 
completion of an engineering evaluation of the sewer system itself - addressing 
specifically the inflow and infiltration of water whose source is not the usual 
household or commercial waste stream. A major program addressing the results of 
this study will be considered during the next year. Department staff have shown 
creativity and dedication in addressing both normal operational problems as well 
as these major capital projects. 

Electricity rates for Ipswich consumers continue to be among the lowest in the 
Commonwealth. Growing demand, particularly in the industrial/commercial area, 
continues to be an issue in a number of ways. New sources of power, par- 
ticularly the gas turbine peaking unit planned for the Ipswich generating plant, 
are being examined by the Commissioners. Special note is made of the likelihood 
that in the near future, private sales will be dominated by the 
industrial/commerical sector. Note is also made that over the past year the 



■38- 



Commissioners have supported agreements between the Massachusetts Municipal 
Wholesale Electric Company (MMWEC, of which Ipswich is a member) and the other 
joint owners of Seabrook to limit the liability of MMWEC (and ultimately 
Ipswich) in the Seabrook Nuclear Project. 

kkkkkkkk 

TOWN MANAGER 
George E. Howe 

Nineteen eighty-nine can best be ascribed as a year of sparse successes over- 
shadowed by acute municipal fiscal anxiety. In general administration, an analysis 
of current and future staffing needs of the Town was undertaken, and a compen- 
dium of municipal fees and user charges was assembled. Recommendations were 
presented to the appropriate ^boards for update either by administrative regula- 
tion or by Town Meeting by-law. Facing a $500,000 reduction in local aid in 
July, after the budget for FY90 had been enacted, orders were issued to cut back 
on spending to help balance the budget. 

Some public works projects were undertaken this past year, most notably repairs 
to Choate Bridge and the Winthrop Street Bridge, the latter being a joint pro- 
ject with the Town of Hamilton; and the interior surfaces of the Pinefield water 
tank were cleaned and painted. Other projects entered feasibility studies 
or detailed design phases, including the phragmites reed treatment process for 
sewage sludge; relocation and reconstruction of Clamshell Road; leak studies on 
our sanitary sewer system, with the objective of better controlling Wastewater 
Treatment Plant operating costs; and a hydrological study of our water distribu- 
tion system. 

Projects which proved difficult to get started included groundwater monitoring 
in our aquifer zoning districts; energy conservation retrofits at the Wastewater 
Treatment Plant; and water meter replacements as authorized by the April 1989 
Town Meeting. 

Public safety highlights include commencing installation of the new radio system 
for the police, improved antennae at the Town Hill and Pinefield water tank, and 
ordering the new fire pumper. Special thanks are extended to Lt. Willard Maker 
for his service as Acting Fire Chief during Chief Emerson's recuperation from 
surgery. 

Efforts were made to encourage more strict code enforcement this year, par- 
ticularly in the water supply districts, requiring architectural oversight of 
larger and more complex construction, and laying the groundwork for the issuance 
of "zoning tickets" for violations. 

Perhaps the most satisfying accomplishment this year was the completion of the 
Cable Gardens Housing project. The Town's role as grantee for a $2.2 million 
HUD grant was minor in this project. Nevertheless, we can point with community 
pride to the success of this multi -year effort to recycle the former Cable 
Hospital . 

In closing, I would like to express my appreciation to the Selectmen, Finance 
Committee, and the Town staff for their continued support during the past year. 



-39- 



******** 

ACCOUNTING DEPARTMENT 

Barry M. Boyce, Town Accountant 

The Accounting Department during Fiscal Year 1989 made great progress toward 
its lofty goals. My accounting staff, Cynthia Burns, Carol Poirier, and Donna 
Foote, was meritorious in its handling of the many changes and demands during 
my first two and one-half years as Town Accountant. 

The Accounting Department has made many gains but has many more gains to 
achieve. To that end our goals will remain high for the coming years. 

******** 

ANIMAL CONTROL 

Harry W. Leno, Jr., Animal Control Officer 

This year storm windows were placed on the Dog Pound to insure the warmth and 
well Deing of the animals held there. A large fund raising effort was under- 
taken by the Ipswich Humane Group. This volunteer organization will expend its 
monies for an overall expansion of the facility, to continue to modernize the 
structure, and to add more dog runs. Their assistance and concern is invaluable 

The Animal Control Officer answered the following complaints: 

Complaints received 3380 

Complaints investigated 3277 

Animals killed by cars 152 

Animals killed by dogs 8 

Dogs picked up 226 

Dogs & cats euthanised 4 

There were 1228 dog licenses issued, 32 kennel licenses, and 44 dogs and cats 
advertised. 

******** 

ASSESSOR'S OFFICE 

Frank J. Ragonese, Chief Assessor 

The total valuation of Real Estate and Personal Property January 1, 1989, was 
$1,003,500,511. 

The valuation of the Town by class is: 

Class I Residential $878,022,400 

II Open Space 

III Commercial 67,248,040 

IV Industrial 46,993,800 
Personal Property 11,236,271 

The proposed tax rate for fiscal year 1990 is $8.99 per thousand for all 
property classes. 

-40- 



******** 



BUILDING DEPARTMENT 

Joseph Ferruzzi, Building Inspector 

The following report represents no appreciable increase in permitting activity 
over 1988 levels (623 in 1989 v.s. 623 in 1988) and a 15% decrease in fee 
collection. 

DWELLING 
NEW BUILDINGS (NB) NEW UNITS (DU) 



Single Family 
Two Family 
Multiple Family 
Commercial /Industrial 
Accessory Buildings 
TOTALS 

ALTERATIONS/ADDITIONS (ALT) 
Single Family 
Two Fami ly 
Multiple Family 
Commercial /Industrial 
TOTALS 



42 
-0- 
1 
11 
13 



67 



90 
6 
-0- 

21 
TTT 



42 

-0- 

27 

-0- 

-0- 



-0- 

-0- 
-0- 

-0- 



■0- 



GRAND TOTALS 
MISCELLANEOUS (MISC) 



67 



ALT 117 



DU 69 



Roofing, siding, pools, sheds, wood stoves, fences, replacement windows, 
repairs, decks, signs, retaining walls, etc. 



TOTAL 



390 



DEMOLITION (DEMO) 




R 




Full 


2 




Partial 




24 




Misc. Structure 




9 




TOTAL 


35 




VIOLATIONS (VIO) 








Zoning By-law (ZBL) 




21 




Building Code (BC) 




3 




Unsafe Building (UB) 




2 




Demo Delay Hi storical 


(DDH) 


-0- 




TOTAL 


26 




GRAND TOTAL - PERMITS 




NUMBER 


FEES 


Building Permits 




623 


$ 66,729 


Plumbing Permits 




179 


9,120 


Gas Permits 




132 


4,315 


Occupancy Permits 




114 


2,140 


Certificates of Inspec 


:tion 


65 


2,453 


GRAND TOTAL 








Fees Col lected 






$ 84,757 


Value of Construction 






$16,823,150 



C/I 
2 

-b- 

-0- 



-41- 



******** 



CEMETERIES/ PARKS DEPARTMENT 
James E. Graff urn, Superintendent 

General grounds work was performed in all of the town's nine cemeteries and 
seven parks and playgrounds. 

Preparation of the new playground equipment site at Bialek Park was accomplished 
by thi s department. 

A three hundred and forty-five foot section of chain link fencing was replaced 
at Bialek Park. 

The addition to the new playground structure for use of the handicapped was 
constructed in early fall of 1989. 

One hundred and fifteen tons of hot top was used to resurface a section of the 
main avenue in the Highland Cemetery. 

All damaged trees from the severe storm in July were cleared up by this 
department. 

Continued to clear area in the Highland Cemetery for future use. 

There were one hundred and six interments in the year of 1989. 

There were three four-grave lots and four two-lot graves awarded to Veterans. 

Ten one-grave, eight two-grave, seven four-grave, one six-grave and three 
eight-grave lots were sold, all with perpetual care. 

There were thirteen Government markers set; eleven corner post sets installed; 
seventy monument foundations poured and twenty markers set. 

Chapel Tent $1,500.00 

Sale of Lots 5,625.00 

Perpetual Care 4,893.00 

Foundations 4,222.50 

Interment Openings 23,400.00 

Total $39,640.50 



********* 



CIVIL DEFENSE 

David R. Clements, Director 

John T. Clogston, Assistant Director 

The year 1989 was a fairly quiet year for our department. There were no local 
emergencies or any alerts in the area. This department was on alert, however, 
during the late autumn when Hurricane Hugo decided to make his move. We have 
large wall weather tracking maps at the Civil Defense office on Green Street. 
There we were able to keep close watch of all tropical storms and hurricanes. 
We tracked Hugo to the Carol inas, and soon we were notified that we were off 
alert. The Emergency Operating Center, located in the Middle School, is open 
every Monday evening from 7:00 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. 

-42- 



All units of Civil Defense meet on a monthly basis. C.P.R., First Aid and 
departmental training continues. The Auxiliary Police, under the direction of 
Captain George Desrocher, continues to qualify in firearms and work with our 
regular Police Department by riding the cruiser with the regular officer eyery 
Friday and Saturday evening. This department meets on the first Monday of the 
month at the Middle School. 

Ken Murphy continues to head the Radiological Department where all the radio 
equipment is tested and maintained. Ipswich Civil Defense invites the public to 
view this office and its equipment any Monday evening. We are in close contact 
with all North Shore Units of Civil Defense on a weekly basis and travel to 
meetings in various parts of the State to stay in touch and keep up to date with 
State requirements and contacts. 

Literature on winter storms, winter fires, general household emergencies, i.e., 
poisoning, cuts seizures, etc., are available to the public. This department 
circulated over 1,000 hurricane tracking maps this past year. 



******** 



COMMUTER RAIL COMMITTEE 
William M. Varrell, Chairman 

This year the varied activities of the Commuter Rail Committee were highlighted 
by the celebration of 150 years of local railroad service. 

In May our updated rider survey indicated that many were dissatisfied with main- 
tenance and the cleanliness of the cars, and the fact that there is an incon- 
venient gap in evening service from Boston between 6:55 and 9:20 p.m. For 
approximately 220 daily commuters, about 50 of whom come from outside Ipswich, 
parking does not seem to be the overwhelming problem expressed in the past. 
Parking fees that will soon be implimented at most MBTA stations will not affect 
Ipswich where the parking lot is owned by the Town. 

During a time when many MBTA bus routes are being considered for elimination, 
they give us little hope for resumption of Sunday service in the near future. 
However, they have said they will re-examine the possibility of express bus ser- 
vice between a railroad station and the airport as soon as the new garage and 
transportation terminal is completed in Lynn. 

Once more we thank the Garden Club for providing the flowers at the station that 
were watered and maintained by volunteers. In addition, we requested and 
received from the MBTA additional trash containers and the flowers planted at 
the entrance to the station. These flowers planted by the MBTA were an experi- 
ment that was so successful that we have requested that it be expanded to other 
stations within the system. 

When we realized, almost by accident, that 1989 was the 150th anniversary of 
railroad service to Ipswich, we decided that a modest celebration was in order. 
Among our anniversary activities were the publication of several railroad 
related postcards in order to make some money to cover expenses and a special 
one-day anniversary postmark requested from the U.S. Postal Service. We also 
researched the local railroad history that was published in the Ipswich 
Chronicle and had a display of local railroad photographs at the Public Library. 

-43- 



On December 18th, the actual anniversary, a brass quintet from the high school 
performed at the station and on several rush hour trains; and birthday cake was 
served to all commuters and guests - in ten degree cold. In addition to the 
local sale of souvenir envelopes and the postmark, we received hundreds of 
requests for it from every state and Canada. 

Not only did this celebration recognize and document a local anniversary, it was 
also intended to recognize vast improvement in local service over the past few 
years. With three new bridges between Ipswich and Boston, many new railroad 
coaches, and a relatively new station in Ipswich, local railroad service is prob- 
ably more healthy and well patronized today than at any time in its entire 
history. Hopefully this celebration has served to remind local residents of 
this \/ery important asset that has for so long benefited this town. 

******** 

CONSERVATION COMMISSION 
Lillian V. North, Chairman 

The Ipswich Conservation Commission is a seven-member official Town board 
charged with the authority of upholding the regulations of the Wetlands 
Protection Act, Chapter 131, Section 40 of the Massachusetts General Laws. 
Under the provisions of the Act, no person may remove, fill, dredge or alter 
certain resource areas without first filing a Notice of Intent and obtaining an 
Order of Conditions. 

The Commission meets bi-weekly and conducts an average of six to twelve on-site 
inspections per month, plus the monitoring of on-going projects, on foot and by 
aerial surveillance. 

The following is a list of 1989 activity compared with 1988 and 1987. 

1987 1988 1989 

Notices of Intent: 41 

Orders of Conditions: 36 

Enforcement Orders: 9 

Determinations of Applicability: 2 

Certificates of Compliance: 3 

The number of Enforcement Orders for wetlands violations rose dramatically in 
1989 due, in part, to heightened awareness of the value of wetlands and the 
environment. Violations were not only found Dy members of the Commission, but 
were reported by citizens, the Building Inspector, the Town Manager, and members 
of the Board of Selectmen. 

In 1989, the Department of Environmental Protection instituted new Notice of 
Intent fees ranging from $55 to $1,000 covering five categories. The new law 
provides for the first $25 to be turned over to the Commission and half of the 
remaining fee, with the second half to be paid to the state. The new law also 
enables Conservation Commission to retain all monies paid to be used to hire 
consultants for difficult projects. 

Work has begun in 1989 on a new Wetlands By-law which will be included in the 
warrant at the April 1990 Town Meeting, the bulk of the work having been under- 
taken by Richard Nylen. Also, with the efforts of Jim Berry, work was begun on 
updating the Town's Open Space and Recreation Plan for 1990. 

-44- 



30 


24 


29 


20 


6 


28 


7 


7 


6 


16 



Dr. Don Kent and John Phillips left the Commission, and they are thanked for 
their participation. Replacing them were Nicholas Vontzalides and Arthur 
Knight, Jr., whose expertise and humor are most welcome. 

******** 

ELECTRIC DEPARTMENT 

Donald R. Stone, Sr., Manager 

In 1989, we saw in increase in the number of electrical services of 123, 
bringing the total number of residential, municipal, business and commercial 
customers to 5,806. Generation at the Power Plant reached a new high again in 
1989 with an increase of 2.4% over the previous high in 1988. The 1989 peak was 
22,060 an increase of 3.3% over the 1988 peak, and was reached on January 4, 
1989. Distribution continued a maintenance and upgrade program that has been 
established over the last six years. In 1989, Ipswich sold 94,383,468 kWH's, an 
increase of 1.8% over 1988. Rowley went off-system November 1, 1989. 

The annual study of municipal electric companies in Massachusetts showed that 
our residential rates remain among the lowest in the state. 

********* 

FIRE DEPARTMENT 

Edwin R. Emerson, Chief 

Lt. Willard Maker, Jr., Acting Chief 

The Town's two newest firefighters attended the Massachusetts Fire Academy's 
seven-week recruit training program. Seven of the Departments 16 full-time 
firefighters have completed this training. Also, our call and full -time person- 
nel completed a total of 504 hours of additional Fire Academy training. In- 
house training is also conducted on a regular basis for all personnel. There 
are now 29 call personnel employed to suppliment the on-duty personnel. 

The Department has purchased a computer and the fire department software to be 
used to store information collected during inspections of properties. It will 
also store locations of all hydrants within the town, and incident records. 
This will greatly assist officers in handling emergencies. 

The Department has accepted the responsibility for checking eyery building in 
town to see that it has the correct street number visible, as required by Town 
by-law. Notices are given to those found not to comply. 

Lt. Dennis Durrell has developed a fire safety education program, including 
"Sparkey the Dog', to teach preschool and elementary school children. This was 
available at all such schools. 

The Department inspected 157 oil burner installations, 113 buildings, 233 smoke 
detector installations, 64 new occupancies. The Department responded to 675 
calls, including: 14 structure fires, 90 outside fires, 15 motor vehicle fires, 
22 heading fires, 18 electrical fires, 43 hazardous materials incidents, 128 
investigations, 105 medical aid, 60 motor vehicle accidents, 64 public assists, 
137 false or accidental alarms, and 6 calls to neighboring towns. The 
Department was yery successful in limiting the damage by fires within buildings, 
to the credit of our firefighters. 

The Department received $6,721 in revenue. 

-45- 



******** 



HALL-HASKELL HOUSE STANDING COMMITTEE 
Vivian Endicott, Chairman 

This has been a year of investigating the best ways for strengthening the interior 
of the house, examining in greater detail all its structural needs, various 
means for heating, lighting, plumbing; and exploring sources of materials. 

Volunteer workers have helped with window sashes, and with outside grading to 
carry water away from the cellar. 

Further architectural drawings have been made to accommodate any future needs in 
use of the upstairs. We have had estimates from two wel 1 -qualified contractors 
for the three phases of interior work - structural, utilities, and restoration. 
There will be other estimates. 

We look forward to the year 1990 when we hope to complete the work, and to 
welcome all of you. 

******** 

HARBORS 

Charles D. Surpitski, Harbormaster 

David R. Brouillette, Assistant Harbormaster 

The waterways of the community have becoming more crowded. The wharf launching 
facility is heavily used. Mooring permits issued rose from 508 last year to 580 
this year. The natural beauty and the easy access the are offers to shore and 
beaches continues to attract visiting boaters in large numbers. Law enforcement 
problems that result from congestion and competing uses are rising. Similarly, 
the probability of accidents increases. 

Through the police department, citizens initiated 110 calls for service. These 
included requests for law enforcement, searches for overdue and missing boaters, 
requests for other types of assistance and crimes on the waterways. 

A new dock was purchased to replace an older dock at the wharf. The older dock 
will become a dinghy dock and thus increase the amount of limited time dock 
usage space. The marking of the rivers continued and markers were repaired and 
replaced as needed. Additional training of personnel to assist in emergency 
situations was undertaken. Such training will continue in the future. 

The Harbormaster increased the mooring fee from $1 to $2 per foot. The Board of 
Selectmen instituted a launching fee at the Wharf of $5 per launch or $35 per 
year for Massachusetts residents and $15 per launch or $105 per year for 
non-Massachusetts residents. Issues of congestion, water pollution, safe 
boating, environmental impact were and will continue to be addressed. 

******** 

HEALTH DEPARTMENT 

Domenic A. Badolato, Jr., Health Agent 

The following is the yearly report of the activities of the Health Department 
under Domenic A. Badolato, Jr., for the year 1989. 



■46- 



LICENSES AND PERMITS ISSUED : 

Food Service 70 

Retail Food 12 

Disposal Works Construction Permits 104 

Septic Haulers 9 

Septic Installers 39 

Swimming Pools 2 

Recreation Camps 2 

HEALTH INSPECTIONS AND INVESTIGATIONS : 

Food Service Inspections 291 

Full Housing Inspections 160 

No Heat Complaints 1 

Trash & Debris Complaints 70 

Insect & Rodent Complaints 5 

Perc Tests 169 

Septic Plans Reviewed 173 

Septic System Inspections 169 

Referrals from Building Inspector 35 

Referrals from Fire Department 6 

Referrals from Police Department 22 

Swimming Pool Inspections 6 

Water Testi ng 38 

Dye Testi ng 94 

Conferences Attended 15 
Health Complaints (Miscellaneous) Investigated 71 

FEES COLLECTED FOR VARIOUS SERVICES : 

Food Permits (Retail Food, Catering, Ice 

Cream, Bakeries, Mobile Food Service) $4,251 

Individual Subsurface Sewage Disposal 
Systems (Perc Tests, Plan Approval, 

Septic Installers, Septic Haulers) $15,060 

Recreational Camps $40 

Miscellaneous (keeping of pigs, ice 

machines, temporary catering) $435 

Swimming Pools $20 

TOTAL $19,806 
******** 

Sealer of Weights & Measures - Normand J. Bedard, Sealer 

The office of the Sealer of Weights and Measures performed numerous functions as 
required by the National Bureau of Standards, the General Laws of Massachusetts, 
as related to Weights and Measures and the Town of Ipswich, Massachusetts, ordi- 
nances. Our sincere thanks to the Sealer of Weights and Measures from Beverly, 
Mr. Ralph O'Brien, and the City of Beverly for the loan of their equipment. 

-47- 



Scales and balances tested and sealed 69 

Avoirdupois, apothecary and metric weights tested and sealed 60 

Scales and balances adjusted and sealed 14 
Scales and balances not sealed 1 

Scales and balances condemned 

Gasoline pump meters tested and sealed 64 

Gasoline pump meters adjusted before sealing 2 

Gasoline pump meters tested and not sealed 

Oil truck meters (vehicle tank meters) tested and sealed 13 

Oil truck meters (vehicle tank meters) adjusted before sealing 2 
Oil truck meters condemned, repaired, retested & approved for sealing 1 

Warnings issued to oil truck drivers for broken seals (in transit) 3 
Leather measuring machines tested and sealed 1 

Number of breads weighed and checked for correct price or weight 20 

Number of breads reweighed and found incorrect 

Meats reweighed for correct price and weight 15 

Meats reweighed and found incorrect 4 

Turkeys and poultry weighed for correct price and weight 20 

Turkeys and poultry weighed and found incorrect 2 

Drug store balances tested and sealed 2 
Drug store balances not sealed 1 

The personal weighers (scales) at all public schools in the Town of Ipswich were 
tested and sealed at no cost to the Town in the year 1989. 

Receipts of Department of Weights and Measurers $1,270 

Salary of Sealer for the year 1989 $3,000 



******** 



HISTORICAL COMMISSION 
Mary P. Conley, Chairman 

The Ipswich Historical Commission has given its attention to several projects 
whose general purpose has been to enhance the historical assets of the Town. 

The first of these was the completion of the first phase of a Preservation 
Planning Report by Gretchen Schuler, historical consultant. This report focused 
on the preservation goals of the Commission: the architectural and structural 
integrity of the historic resources, the preservation of streetscapes and neigh- 
borhoods, the protection of overall context of the Town and its unique charac- 
ter; and the preservation of open space. The consultant noted that the 
Commission has accomplished much with its inventories of historic areas. These 
surveys led to the National Register recognition of four districts. Since these 
areas have a national importance, she recommended that they be given the protec- 
tion of historic district legislation. The Commission discussed this recommen- 
dation and possible alternatives, and finally voted to recommend to the Board of 
Selectmen that they appoint an Historic District Study Committee. 

An interesting part of the year's work was our involvement with the restoration 
of Choate Bridge. The key to its success was the cooperation between all those 
participating, especially that of Westrack Construction Company, the general 
contractor, and Jiba Construction Company which did all the masonry work. Jiba 
was chosen through a process by which the masonry firms were pre-qual if ied - a 
procedure which, though time consuming, gave us the skills of highly qualified 

-48- 



masons. Lisa Martin, the Anderson Nichols engineer, and Armand Michaud, head of 
the Public Works Department were most cooperative in seeking our input on 
historical aspects of the project. The bridge engineering consultants, A.G. 
Lichtenstein and Associates examined the bridge when the work was nearly 
completed and found that it was very satisfactory in all respects. 

The Commission expresses its appreciation to the Selectmen, the Town Manager, 
and the townspeople for their support for the kind of project that was not just 
a quick-fix but was a true restoration of which we can be proud. 

In the spring, the Commission was awarded a matching grant of $4,000 from the 
Massachusetts Historical Commission to be used with a $4,000 Town appropriation 
for a project entitled "Ipswich Comprehensive Nineteenth Century Industrial and 
Ethnic Survey." The Commission members have long felt that there was a dearth 
of information concerning the Town's industrial development, and this project 
should dig out the facts for us. The historical consultant is Christine Beard. 
Much of the research will focus on the history of the early mills, their loca- 
tions, products, workers and housing. And in particular, the consultant will 
study the coming to town of the various ethnic groups - the Irish, the French, 
the Polish, and the Greek. The goal of the whole project in general is to pro- 
duce a more complete history of this critical period in the Town's history than 

is now avai lable. 

******** 

IPSWICH HOUSING AUTHORITY 
Sara S. O'Connor, Chairman 

The Ipswich Housing Authority successfully completed a site search for family 
housing in 1989. The Board of Commissioners voted unanimously to purchase pro- 
perty on Linebrook Road and forge ahead with plans to build 20 units of low- 
income family housing. The Executive Office of Community Development approved 
the selected site and sent written approval for the development to proceed to 
the architectural phase. 

A four acre parcel of land was donated to the Ipswich Housing Authority by local 
resident Frederick Woodworth. Mr. Woodworth, a senior citizen, realizing the 
need for low-income housing for the elderly, approached the IHA with his 
generous offer in April of 1989. The IHA accepted the property with the 
understanding it would be used for elderly and handicapped housing for low- 
income people. The development is at the architectural phase. 

Cable Gardens was officially opened in December of 1989. Twenty-eight units of 
low-income housing for senior citizens were quickly filled; Ipswich residents 
were given priority. 

The IHA, reaching out to service low-income citizens in various capacities, 
approved Irenicon House and the Conwell House as "project specific"; thus helping 
those who would be otherwise unassisted in the housing market. 

The Board of Commissioners thank Ray Daniels and the staff for their continued 
commitment to public housing in Ipswich. 

Finally, the resignation of Stanley Eustace was accepted "with regret". 



-49- 



******** 



THE IPSWICH ARTS COUNCIL 

Jon Aaron and Georgina J. Traverso, Co-Chairs 

The Ipswich Arts Council held a hearing on April 12, 1989, to vote on 
Massachusetts Arts Lottery spring grants to artists who had applied. Seven 
grants were awarded as follows: The League of Women Voters for their Ipswich 
River Festival; Friends of the Doyon School for the funding of a 
"Playwright-in-Residence"; Mary Copeland for paintings; The Ipswich Theatre 
Ensemble for a summer theatre performance; the United Methodist Church for a 
Sunday afternoon music series; Susan Ingram for paintings; and "Cantemus" for a 
concert given at the First Congregational Church. The Ipswich School Department 
grant proposal, submitted by Fine Arts Co-ordinator, Monica Cirrito-Sheppard, 
also received funding for PASS so that students could attend a University of 
Lowell performance and Boston Symphony youth concerts. 

During Old Ipswich Days, the Arts Council sponsored the Third Annual Art Exhibit 
to show the works of Ipswich painters, sculptors, ceramists, and photographers. 
A total of $1,300 in prize money was awarded. The Arts Council accepted on 
behalf of the Town the gift of a painting of Ipswich donated by the artist, 
William Landmesser. Mr. Landmesser had been a 1988 grant recipient, and his 
gift painting was displayed at the 1989 Art Exhibit. 

On October 4, 1989, the fall grants hearings was held; and grants were awarded 
to applicants as follows: Judith Wilson Fouser for paintings; Pamela Wootton 
for paintings; Hideaki Miyamura for ceramics using Ipswich clay; The Winthrop 
School Friends Special Programs Committee; and the Massachusetts High School 
Drama Guild. The Ipswich School Department was again given a grant for PASS 
funding for Youth Concerts. 

****••** 

LIBRARY 

Eleanor M. Gaunt, Librarian 

Crocker Snow, Sr., Chairman, Library Trustees 

Our 1989 statistics show that we served more of you than ever before, offering 
books, magazines, records, videos, music and spoken cassettes. There was a 4% 
increase in circulation over 1988: 89,401 vs. 85,891 items. Because of a 
decline in LP records, there were 751 fewer audiovisual items circulated in 
1989. We borrowed 469 books from other libraries for Ipswich residents, up from 
328 the previous year. 

Re-registration of borrowers for new, barcoded plastic library cards averages 
75-100 per month. Total number of registered borrowers stands at 5,321. We 
added 3,083 books to the collection, up from 2,872, bringing the total number of 
books to 61,037. We added 131 cassettes to the collection for a total of 571; 
12 records, total 1,544; and 19 videos for a total of 87. We maintain 155 maga- 
zine and newspaper subscriptions. 

The Reference Department handled over 1,800 inquiries, reflecting increased 
demand for information in a variety of areas: business, law, local government, 
consumer goods, to name but a few. A sampling ranges from information on 



-50- 



profit-sharing plans to providing a recipe for home-made dog biscuits. Our stu- 
dent population is served by reference collection development policies 
reflecting school curricula. Nearly 400 visits were paid to the Archives Room 
for local history and genealogy. 

Service to children continues to be a major focus of the library. Six pre- 
school story times were attended by some 360 children. We host visits from local 
kindergarten and nursery schools, along with conducting a monthly program for 
Head Start. Holiday activities included after-school programs with video and 
crafts related to the special Holiday. Library tours and instruction are held 
for local scout troops. The Summer Reading Program, "Brush Up On Reading" 
attracted over 200 youngsters, and through the assistance of the Friends of the 
Library, the Children's Department co-sponsored four programs on early childhood 
behavior with the Anne Sullivan Center. 

Response to the Museum Library Pass Program of the Friends has been substantial. 
Free passes are available to six area museums. This invaluable support group 

continues to sponsor programs for children and adults, and to supplement our 
range of audiovisual materials. 

During 1989, the library went to line - a significant milestone in the Library's 
history - as we completed the conversion from a manual book charging system to 
an automated system, concluding three years of preparation. What this means for 
Ipswich residents is the capability to draw on literally millions of items which 
are stored in the local data base, and through computer technology, it is now 
possible to secure a book or piece of information from almost anywhere through you 
local public library. 

Efforts to expand the library facility were again put on hold when word was 
received from the Board of Library Commissioners that our Construction Grant 
Application was denied. 

Last year's town meeting appropriated $98,000 for air conditioning, necessary 
for comfort and essential for preservation of books and irreplaceable historic 
manuscripts. At the Town Manager's suggestion, plans and specifications 
necessary for bidding were paid for by donated library trust funds, so that the 
job could be let out to contract as soon as the appropriation became available 
on July 1, 1989. Bidding documents were ready to go early in July, but the Town 
Manager, despite repeated requests from the Trustees, has refused to publish the 
invitations to bid, and now proposes to ask the next town meeting to rescind the 
$98,000 appropriation so that the money can be used elsewhere. (C.S.) 

Remember - the Public Library is Ipswich's OTHER educational institution. Plan 
to visit your library during 1990 and take advantage of your community's single 
information and educational resource, and center for recreational reading. 



******** 



MASTER PLAN COMMISSION 
Benjamin Fierro III, Chairman 

In 1989 the Master Plan Commission continued its process of identifying growth 
issues in the Town and developing potential responses to them. The year began 
with intensive work on the proposed five acre office park district for the Route 
One Corridor. The purpose of the district was four-fold: to protect environ- 
mental resources; to preserve natural landscapes; to provide for more compatible 

-51- 



types of uses; and to promote appropriate business development. Drafted by the 
Commission's zoning subcommittee, the proposed bylaw received a majority vote at 
last year's Town Meeting but failed to garner the two-thirds support needed for 
passage. 

At the urging of then Board of Selectmen Chairman Thomas Elliott, the Commission 
restructured its zoning subcommittee to include two non-voting members to repre- 
sent the interests of both the residents and business owners in the Route One 
Corridor. Working to develop an acceptable compromise, a redrafted corridor 
protection zoning bylaw is expected to be presented at the 1990 Town Meeting. 
Again the Commission has had the benefit of the technical assistance of Town 
Planner Elizabeth Ware and the consulting firm of Connery Associates. 

In the past year the Commission also continued its examination of long-range 
growth and historic preservation issues. The infrastructure subcommittee 
completed its work with Tufts University to produce a study of the maximum 
potential "build-out" of Ipswich under the current Zoning Bylaw. And the 
historic subcommittee recommended, and the Commission endorsed, the call by the 
Historical Commission for the creation of a Historic District Study Committee. 

The year 1989 was also a year of change for the Master Plan Commission. George 
Mathey, Catherine Lefebvre, Steve Miles, and past chairman Douglas Denninger 
resigned. Joining the Commission were new members Richard McKinnon, Robert 
McNeil, and Dana Jordan. In addition, Ruth Barton became a new secretary to the 
Master Plan Commission. 

******** 

METROPOLITAN AREA PLANNING COUNCIL 
William E. Bingham, Representative 

With the support of Ipswich and 100 other communities in the region, the 
Metropolitan Area Planning Council was able to continue to provide planning ser- 
vices, information and advice for regional communities during 1989. 

Throughout the year, MAPC concentrated on refining MetroPlan 2000, the regional 
growth plan adopted in principle by representatives at the 1989 annual meeting 
in May. The regional development framework will aid communities in designating 
potential growth areas based on the availability of infrastructure, and in 
designating areas where growth should be discouraged. 

With a regional plan, growth can be directed so that affordable housing issues 
are addressed, open space and environmentally sensitive areas are protected, and 
transportation habits that contribute to traffic congestion and air pollution 
are changed. 

At the same time, planned growth can encourage new job opportunities by pro- 
viding incentives for growth in specific areas. In addition, with a shortage of 
funds to build new roads or maintain old ones, planned growth encourages the 
best use of limited resources. 

In fiscal year 1989, which runs from July 1, 1988 through June 30, 1989, Ipswich 
contributed $2,237 to MAPC for regional planning services. 

In addition to MetroPlan 2000 planning efforts, MAPC staff produced community 
population and employment forecasts, and updated the development file and vacant 
sites survey for each community. 

-52- 



Some communities also took advantage of information programs, and met with MAPC 
planners to discuss the federal Transportation Improvement Program, trip reduc- 
tion tools, curb cut controls, and impact fees. In Ipswich: 

° The Board of Selectmen endorsed transportation priorities 
established by the North Shore Transportation Task Force. 
Subsequently, three of the projects were included in the 
Massachusetts Department of Public Works Five Year Highway Plan 
of the Regional Transportation Improvement Program. 

° NSTTF adopted a voluntary regional impacts review procedure for 
new developments. 

MAPC provided the federal Census Bureau with a database of signi- 
ficant workplaces in the nine regional communities outside the 
Census Bureau's address coding files. The towns are: Bolton, 
Boxborough, Carlisle^, Essex, Hopkinton, Ipswich, Littleton, 
Middleton, and Stow. 

° MAPC transportation staff researched the status of a bridge pro- 
ject for the Board of Selectmen. 

MAPC appreciates our continued support. In the coming year, we are encouraged 
to engage in MetroPlan 2000 planning activities, as well as to utilize the 
planning skills and knowledge available from MAPC staff. 

******** 

PLANNING BOARD 

Patrick J. McNally, Chairman 

Elizabeth M. Ware, Town Planner 

Even with the purported lag in the real estate market, the Planning Board has 
been extremely busy this past year. In addition to reviewing a number of deve- 
lopment proposals, the Board revised several of their regulations and fee sche- 
dules and continues to work to concentrate on long-range growth issues 
confronting Ipswich. The Board's staff, consisting of a full-time Planner, part' 
time assistant and part-time subdivision inspector, have all worked to insure 
that Planning Board research, policies and the actual construction of approved 
developments progress properly. 

Within fiscal year 1989-90, the Board reviewed a number of development plans. 
These included: approximately 28 Form A plans (subdivision approval not 
required); 2 preliminary subdivision plans; 8 definitive subdivision plans 
(which created 55 new building lots); 6 special permit applications and 4 
site plans. The adoption of the Water Supply District By-law in 1983 and the 
Site Plan Review by-law in 1987 have both contributed greatly to the Board's 
workload; however, the Board believes that these by-laws are critically impor- 
tant in the future growth of the town. The Water Supply District by-law was 
established to assure continued control and monitoring of development within 
town water supply districts. The Board is presently working with its con- 
sultants, Metcalf and Eddy Co., on a groundwater monitoring program for the High 
Street/Mitchell Road area. This effort will result in regular monitoring for 
Brown's well and, ultimately, will operate to insure clean water to present and 
future Ipswich residents. 



-53- 



Established primarily to mitigate traffic and drainage impacts of newly 
constructed buildings within town, the site plan review by-law was originally 
subject of controversy. While this by-law appears to be more accepted by the 
development community, it remains a controversial by-law. After working with 
the by-law for over the past two years, the Board has discovered that changes 
will be required in order to make it a more effective by-law. 

Controversy has not be exclusive to by-laws within the past year. The position 
of Town Planner continues to be a hotly debated issue among town residents and 
developers alike. The Board strongly believes that for the present and future 
growth of Ipswich a planner is necessary to oversee the day-to-day activities 
within the Planning Board office as well as to research and plan for the long 
range growth of the Town. With legal and permiting procedures becoming more 
complex over the years, the wide range of Planning Board responsibilities under 
Chapters 40A and 41 of the Massachusetts General Laws and the need for constant 
communications between departments, a full-time professional staff person is 
invaluable - it is unrealistic to believe that this volunteer board would be 
able to operate as efficiently without such staffing. 



******** 



POLICE DEPARTMENT 

Charles D. Surpitski, Chief 

During the past year, all acting positions were filled on a permanent basis. 
Charles D. Surpitski was appointed Chief, Gavin Keenan and Daniel Moriarty as 
Sergeants, and Peter Dziadose and Thomas Colpitts as Patrolmen. The department 
is now at full strength. 

Remaining responsive to the needs of the community, certain personnel were 
realigned to deal with the complex proolem of crime and the troubling problem of 
alcohol and illegal drug use. To this end, an officer has been assigned to work 
closely with community prevention programs and another to increase investiga- 
tory efforts and enforcement against drug sales and related crimes. 

Police Officers answered 7517 citizens initiated calls for service, issued 1524 
non-criminal traffic citations, and made 444 arrests resulting in 921 criminal 
law violations. A statistical analysis of the types of calls answered follows: 

Larceny 224 

Liquor Law Violations 31 

Motor Vehicle Theft/Recovery 53 

Malicious Damage 215 

Medical Aid 177 

Missing & Runaways 67 

Motor Vehicle Accidents 399 

Offences Against Family 180 

Suspicion 490 

Stolen Property (Receiving) 6 

Weapons Carrying/Possessing 15 

Warrant Arrests Non-Ipswich 43 

The Department will continue its efforts to meet the changing needs and expectations 
of the community. State-of-the-art police service will be guaranteed by ongoing 
training programs. Citizen involvement and input will be recognized and valued. 
Cooperatively, Ipswich can become a safer community. 

-54- 



Alarms 


703 


Assaults 


51 


Breaking & Entering 


103 


Deaths & Suicide 


16 


Disorderly 


633 


Driving Under Influence 


56 


Drunkeness 


112 


Escorts 


968 


Forcible Rape 


3 


Forgery 


3 


Fraud 


12 



******** 

PUBLIC WORKS DEPARTMENT 
Armand T. Michaud, Director 

The Public Works Department coordinates the activities of the following divi- 
sions: Public Works Administration, Highway, Forestry, Equipment Maintenance, 
and Snow and Ice Control. Each division is charged with particular respon- 
sibilities relating to its duties. When additional manpower is required to per- 
form specific tasks, personnel are interchanged within the divisions. 

Below is a summary of the work completed by each of the Public Works Divisions. 

Snow and Ice Control 

The Public Works Divisions combine their work forces during the winter months. 
Work consists of plowing roads, hauling snow, sanding, salting roadways, filling 
sand barrels, cleaning catch basins, clearing snow away from hydrants and 
answering miscellaneous complaints. Other personnel assisting the Public Works 
crews during the height of the snow storms were from the Cemetery, Water, and 
Sewer Departments. Also utilized were the services of 12 private contractors. 

Equipment Maintenance Division - Robert Hetnar, Diesel Mechanic 
All Public Works vehicles are serviced and repaired at the Town Garage. At pre- 
sent there are 32 pieces of motorized equipment that must be kept in good 
operating condition to insure availability when needed. Operation cost records 
showing maintenance and gas/oil expenses on each vehicle can be ascertained from 
the Public Works Administration Office in the Town Hall. 

Building Maintenance Division 

Routine maintenance and minor repairs were performed at the Town Hall and 
Municipal Garage throughout the year. New heating pipes were installed in the 
Town Hal 1 . 

Highway Division - Norman Stone, Foreman 

The Highway Division which is the largest in the Public Works Department is 
charged with the maintenance and repairing of the Town's streets and drainage 
systems. The winter schedule consists mainly of Snow and Ice Control and 
routine maintenance which does not require excavation. During the other three 
seasons, the men are kept busy with projects varying from road construction to 
street sweeping. 

Normal maintenance consists of patching streets, repairing the Town's drains, 
repairing sidewalks, and maintenance on all signs. 

All catch basins in Town were cleaned. Several plugged drains were cleared. 
New storm drains were put in on Lakemans Lane, Linebrook Road, and Newbury Road. 

The following roads were hot topped: Newbury Road, Boxford Road, and Wildes 
Court. 

Street sweeping was performed twice a week in the downtown area from April to 
December. All Town roads and sidewalks were swept in the spring to rid them of 
wi nter sand deposits. 



-55- 



Crosswalks, parking spaces, and traffic lines were painted in the downtown 
areas. As in previous years, the crosswalks were painted green. Also, 142,239 
linear feet of center lines and fog lines were painted. 

All gravel roads were graded twice in 1989. 

The Highway Division purchased one new truck and plow and one new front end 
loader and plow. 

Other projects included rebuilding the parking lot at the Ipswich Savings Bank, 
Hills Family Store, and Town parking lot. The Choate Bridge and the Winthrop 
Street Bridge were also rebuilt. 

Forestry Division - Robert Comeau, Foreman 

The mitigation of the Dutch Elm Disease has again been one of the principal con- 
cerns of the Forestry Division. Approximately 192 elm trees with beetle 
infestation were removed as well as maples, oaks, lindens, and pines. 

Each first grade student was given an ash tree to take, plant, and care for in 
observance of Arbor Day. About 317 trees were donated. 

The Forestry Division planted approximately 98 various types of trees around 
Town. Also, they planted several trees on High Street and Argilla Road for 
local Garden Clubs. 

Round-up was sprayed along several miles of roadside to control brush and weeds. 

Other work performed by the Forestry Division consists of trimming and pruning 
trees, removing limbs, cutting brush (major projects were along Kimball Brook, 
as well as several roads), roadside mowing, setting up voting booths for elec- 
tion, and setting up for the Annual Town Meeting. 



******** 



RECREATION AND YOUTH DEPARTMENT 
Elizabeth M. Dorman, Director 

Programs and activities were organized for various age groups. For children 
there were summer playground programs, swim, tennis, and golf lessons, Halloween 
Parade & Program, Xmas program, vacation week activities, summer track, sand 
sculpture and several trips (roller skating, Canobie Lake, Bevery Luau, pizza 
party/magic show, movie trip, Children's Museum). The Hershey track com- 
petition had seven local youngsters qualify for a total of six events at the 
State Meet. 

Activities for teens included ski trips, a Red Sox game, roller skating. Xmas 
shopping, a dance, and trips to movies, Canobie Lake, Water Country and 
"Haunted" Hammond Castle. Trips and events were also organized twice a month 
during the school year for special needs youngsters in our local Saturday 
Recreation Program. 

Volleyball and basketball programs continued for adults as well as tennis 
lessons, ballroom dance classes, Community Band, and a trip to the Boston Pops. 
Family events included Xmas programs, the annual Marathon, a block dance, summer 



56- 



evening outdoor concerts, and a Red Sox game, and civic events such as the 
Memorial Day Parade and the July 4th Children's Parade and Field Day. Senior 
citizen activities included trips to the Flower Show, J.F.K. Library, Copley 
Place, Aquarium, Freeport, Maine, a N.H. blueberry farm, Vietnam Wall Replica, 
Beverly Lobster Festival, Bolton Orchards, Fall River Outlet Shopping and the 
Pheasant Lane Mall, as well as transportation to nearby concerts, Giordano's 
Dinner Theatre, and the Topsfield Fair. A billiards program began on weekday 
mornings at the Memorial Building. 

Office activities included the issuing of over 300 permits for ballfields and 
tennis court use as well as scheduling the various users of the Memorial 
Building. Registrations were handled for over 600 swim slots and numerous trips 
for different age groups as well as the Marathon. A Life Skills Class of older 
teens from the Cape Ann Collaborative used Memorial Building space three days a 
week beginning in September. 

Affiliation continued with the National Youth Sports Coaching Association and 
training was again provided for local volunteer coaches. Several were certified 
in baseball, Softball, or soccer after attending sessions taught by the 
Recreation Director. 

Cooperation with the School Department allowed a sharing of fields and facili- 
ties; and alliances were continued with veterans' groups, senior citizens, youth 
and adults sports leagues, Scout and Campfire groups, and the YMCA. Many town 
groups used the Memorial Building for meetings, registration sessions, and 
classes. Coordination with PARK, a parent's group interested in improved equip- 
ment at local playgrounds included a major fundraiser, a family Fun Fair in 
February. New equipment was purchased cooperatively by PARK and Town 
appropriations, and it was installed at Bialek Park by a volunteer work crew in 
May, followed by a dedication ceremony in June. An addition for handicapped 
youngsters, made possible by a grant from Bio Labs, was installed in the fall. 
Plans for improvements at Great Neck Playground were developed with input from 
residents of that area, and a Bialek snack bar was built with funds and labor 
from Little League. 

Lifeguard coverage at Pavilion Beach continued daily through the summer season, 
and a number of rescues were performed by staff members. The swim program 
returned to Don Bosco, and students were bused for two sessions a day. A 
weekly golf lesson was offered for teens at the Ipswich Country Club. 

The seven-member Recreation Commission and Recreation Director met regularly 
throughout the year to discuss programs, plans, facilities, and policies. 

******** 



SHELLFISH DEPARTMENT 

Philip A. Kent, Shellfish Constable 

Thomas F. Dorman, Chairman, Shellfish Advisory Board 

The year 1989 should mark the beginning of an upward trend in the shellfishing 
effort in Ipswich and other nearby communities, following a four year period of 
poor harvests. Many new seed beds have been reported to be growing and should 
provide for better clamming over the next two years. Oyster fishing has grown 



-57- 



over the last two years. The bottoms of many shallow creeks contain modest num- 
bers of oysters, most being attached to rocks and old mussel or sea clam shells. 
To protect this young fishery, a daily limit of 30 oysters is enforced with a 
closed season from May 1st through August 31st. 




The red tide appeared again this year, keeping all forms of shellfishing 
restricted through most of June and July. The levels of red tide were the 
highest they have been since 1973. Sea clams are still restricted at this time 
as they have retained just over the limit amounts of the red tide toxin. We 
have experienced closures for red tide in every 5 out of 6 years. 

Several projects were in progress during 1989. Selective crab potting inshore 
in creeks produced 265 bushels of green crabs, the #1 predator of soft-shelled 
clams. Hydraulic cultivation, the washing of the top 1-2 inches of the topsoil 
on muddy unproductive areas to remove silt and to increase the size of the sur- 
face particles has been attempted on a small scale. This type of project needs 
further testing to determine if new seed has appeared in the experimental areas 
The recreation area in Eagle Hill Cove and the Eagle Hill Reef were the reci- 
pients of reseeded clams from Nuffield Reef. Relaying was done in August and 
agai n in October. 

Rainfall closures, a state procedure, prevent the taking of all shellfish for 
three days following a rainfall of more than one-half inch within the 24 hour 
period. This restriction has limited the number of days that recreational and 
commercial she! If i shermen can use the resource. 



•****•** 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENT 

SCHOOL COMMITTEE 

Jeffrey A. Simon, Chairman 

During the last year, the Ipswich Schools continued their forward progress 
toward excellence at all levels. The School Committee and Superintendent 
Richard Thompson have worked closely together to have the system give emphasis 
to several areas in particular. These included critical thinking skills, 
reading, and math. Each area has always been a vital part of the curriculum, 
but they are distinguished this year because the research and recommendations 
for change from nationally known groups have been so significant. 

In the area of critical thinking skills, we are trying to incorporate reasoning 
in a way that will prepare our students to deal with large amounts of infor- 
mation that change rapidly. Several studies have suggested that today's gra- 
duates will change careers, not just jobs but careers, four times in their 
working lives. Therefore, they need to be able to analyze, to compare, to draw 
inferences and conclusions. This will be true no matter what the job or the 
skill level required. 



-58- 



Reading is another area that has undergone tremendous change. Reading is the 
key to so many other areas of learning, that it is extremely important that 
every new and proven method of teaching children to read be used. The change 
from teaching reading primarily through primers to teaching reading as a gateway 
to thought and expression has been firmly incorporated into the curriculum and 
continues to be one of the most productive and exciting areas of the school 
system's improvement. 

The National Council of Teachers of Mathematics produced a new set of curriculum 
objectives which this organization's members feel are important not just to the 
teaching of math, but to the teaching of math as it relates to the competitive 
position of the United States in the world today. It stresses the real world 
goals of problem solving, of estimating, of making use of the technology of com- 
puters and calculators. It suggests that we need to spend time not only on 
teaching number facts, but on making sure that students know which facts and 
which approaches they need to be mindful of to deal with issues in an 
increasingly technological world. 

The year at Ipswich High School was marked by the retirement of Charles McKenzie 
as Assistant Principal. Charlie, whose teaching abilities, compassion, and 
sense of humor were a part of the high school for so many years, staged his last 
graduation ceremony in June. He was replaced by Richard Kieran who began with 
us last fall. Highlights of the year at Ipswich High School included 
outstanding scores for our students on the Advanced Placement Examinations given 
to high school students for college credit. The achievements of the students 
that took the exams this year were the best to day, and compare favorably to the 
best in the country. Another highlight was the beginning of the satellite 
learning center which will allow Ipswich students and faculty to participate in 
national teleconferencing and classes. The single biggest challenge is to main- 
tain our diverse course offerings in the face of declining high school 
enrollment. I am glad to be able to report that largely through the creativity 
of Principal Steve Fortado, this has been accomplished. Beginning next year, 
enrollment will begin a long slow climb. 

A leadership change also occurred at the Ipswich Middle School. Principal 
Ronald Landman accepted a job in the Swampscott school system. Ron's concerns 
for the success of students and his accomplishments in bringing the Middle 
School from a junior high school to a real middle school have left the foun- 
dation for a tremendous amount of future success. Ron was replaced on an 
interim basis by Barry Hopping, who was Athletic Director. One highlight of the 
year was having a student, Daniel Hughes, receive an Honorable Mention in the 
Boston Globe Art Contest. In another area, the teaching teams for each grade 
built on the middle school concept by incorporating interdisciplinary units into 
the year, with the 6th grade doing an environmental unit, and the 7th and 8th 
grades approaching the teaching of all subject areas from the point of view of a 
historical look at the relations that countries have had with each other. 

At the Doyon school, progress continued in all areas, with several items of par- 
ticular notice. The use of calculators as a teaching tool for math was greatly 
increased. Reading was given special emphasis with the accomplishment by the 
Doyon students of reading one million minutes. Even Principal Ken Cooper was 
porting an "I Read One Million Minutes" button. In keeping with the need to 
teach not only academics but to instill values, the school adopted Politeness as 
its focus this year. Discussions, assemblies, and Doyon Politeness buttons all 
helped this effort. A very successful playwright in residence program was held, 



59- 



with playwright Barbara Bejoian working at the school. Thirty students were 
involved in writing a play which was then performed with the involvement of 100 
students. The Friends of Doyon sponsored a hard bound journal program where 
students will have a five-year record of their progress in writing. Involving 
parents in a major effort to reinforce writing can only be a formula for both 
current and future success. 

Winthrop School saw progress in both academic areas, physical plant, and staff 
development. A whole language course given for college credit was sponsored at 
Winthrop for both Winthrop and Doyon teachers. This provided an exciting frame- 
work for teachers to incorporate the latest research and teaching skills into 
the curriculum. A real community effort occurred to renovate the cafeteria. 
The Friends of Winthrop, the Friends of the Arts, the School Improvement 
Council, and a major fundraiser, all contributed to a new floor, murals on the 
wall, acoustic tiles, and new stage curtains. The room is a central focus not 
only for the school, but for the community. Principal Rebecca van der Bogart's 
outreach efforts with items like the Parents Forum, have served to bring a 
steady stream of parents into the building at all times. The Volunteers in 
School program, designed to bring members of the community in to help out with 
teaching duties in the classroom on a regular basis, has brought in several 
hundred people/hours per month, going as high as 275 hours in one month. Values 
reinforcement through a program called PEP, or People Encouraging People, was 
designed to catch students in the act of helping someone else. PEP badges were 
worn with great pride by a variety of students. 

In summary, it has been a year of steady growth, of concrete achievement, and of 
system development. While the constraints of Proposition 2i coupled with cut- 
backs in State funding have made it harder to do more with less, the community 
should be proud that it has a school system which values excellence, learning, 
and achievement at all levels. 



******** 



SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS 
Richard F. Thompson 

Calendar Year 1989 was again a year for new administrators in the Ipswich School 
System. Richard Kieran came to us as Assistant Principal at the High School 
replacing Charlie McKenzie; Barry Hopping moved from Athletic Director's posi- 
tion to the Middle School Principal replacing Ron Landman who accepted a prin- 
cipal ship in Swampscott; and Chuck Holman has moved from full-time teacher at 
Ipswich High School to become the Athletic Director for Ipswich. I'm happy to 
report that feedback from parents and students is that these new administrators 
are doing well, and each is making progress and building on the accomplishments 
of his predecessor. 

Each year the Ipswich School System attempts to improve its performance and 
efficiency in all the many areas required by the law, by parents, and our stu- 
dents' needs. I would like to comment on two programs which have received many 
honors for their accomplishments and some discussion over the past twelve 
months. 

-60- 



The Fine Arts Program is now clearly one of the best programs in the State. 
During the last year, the following honors were conveyed on the program or the 
school district: 

The National School Boards Association award from recognition of 

outstanding support of the arts in education. 

The High School Jazz Ensemble placed second in the State District 

Jazz Competition. 

Three students received Boston Globe Scholastic Art Awards. 
° Five students received State All-Cast Acting Awards. 

Three students made Northeast Junior District Chorus and Band. 
° Eleven students made Northeast Senior District Chorus, Band, or 

Jazz Band. Six students were recognized at State Level. 
° A High School Senior won the Hallmark Honor Award given to the 

top five art students in the State. 
° A sophomore was the highest scoring soprano in the State and was 

recommended for the National Eastern Division Honors Chorus. 

This past year, fifteen seniors went into the arts or arts-related undergraduate 
programs; our second largest group after liberal arts. 

The Gifted and Talented Program (GATE) has also had some great accomplishments 
during the past year. One of our fourth grade students, Christopher Nylen, 
represents the third consecutive year in which Ipswich has had one of only 104 
winners in the Nationwide contest for young writers. For different students to 
win consistently on a national level, we know something good must be happening. 

Students participated in the "JASON Project", a live broadcast from the floor of 
the Mediterranean Sea. One local student had the privilege of asking Dr. Ballard, 
creator of the JASON Project, a question (by satellite) about what they were 
finding under the sea. 

Students also participated in the "Kids' Network" program which is sponsored by 
the National Geographic Society. This program has our students gathering scien- 
tific information and sharing data and results with students all over the 
country. This combination of working with real scientists, other students, and 
sharing research data by computer is outstanding science education. 

On a system-wide basis, these programs are but two of many which continue to 
improve in quality if not in resources. We are all proud of these exemplary 
programs. 

It is my firm belief and hope that even though the Proposition 2i effects are 
now negatively impacting the school system, we will all continue to improve the 
quality of services to all Ipswich citizens from the \/ery young through the 
senior citizens during the next year. 



******•• 



PAUL F. DOYON MEMORIAL SCHOOL 
Kenneth B. Cooper, Ph.D., Principal 

The 1988-1989 school year can best be characterized as one of general stability 
in terms of faculty and student population, and as a period of significant growth 
in instructional programs. 

-61- 



Our student population has remained constant at about 390, with an average class 
size of 21-22 students (less in Kindergarten and Readiness). 

New to the staff were: 1) Mrs. Carol St. John in grade 4. Mrs. St. John comes to 
us with sixteen years of classroom experience and a Masters Degree in Writing 
from Northeastern; 2) Mrs. Donna C. Gale in Guidance - Mrs. Gale worked as 
Elementary Guidance Counselor in Marblehead for several years and holds a 
Masters Degree in Counseling from the University of Massachusetts at Amherst; 
and 3) Mrs. John Frank, our new art teacher - Mrs. Frank has 12 years of 
experience in elementary classroom instruction, has published numerous articles 
in art periodicals, and holds a Masters Degree from Drew University. 

The year 1988-1989 was a period of continued growth in several major areas of 
the curriculum at the Doyon Elementary School. In Reading, we acquired a new 
literature-based basal text ( The World of Reading , published by Silver Burdette) 
which facilitates integration of writing and reading. Hundreds of new books, 
including the Halloran Collection , have been added to our library. We also 
began--and more importantly, completed--a "Million Minutes of Reading" 
schoolwide program. The Math program has been moving towards implementing the 
1989 recommendations of the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics by 
1) focusing increasingly on problem solving; 2) expanding the use of math mani- 
pulatives (and other "Math Their Way" activities) at all grade levels; and 3) 
introducing the use of calculators. Our language arts and writing programs were 
strengthened by 1) staff development initiatives in the use of "whole language" 
techniques; 2) continued expansion in the use of the "writing process;" 3) 
acquisition of hard-bound journals to be used over a number of years for all 
students K-2; and 4) a playwright in residence program which culminated in four 
gala presentations of two plays written by our students. 

We are especially pleased about strides made in the science program. Five 
faculty members participated in an extensive training program jointly sponsored 
by the Massachusetts Elementary School Principal's Association and Tufts 
University. In addition, Mrs. Winifred Stone, Mrs. Josephine Burke, and 
Mrs. Dorothy Nicholas applied for and received summer science internships as 
part of the Museum Institute for Teaching Science. We are looking forward to 
integrating even more "hands-on" experiences in our science program. 

Doyon continues to do well in the standardized testing department, with the 
schoolwide median Total Battery on the California Achievement Tests above the 
85th percentile. Scores in all areas on the Massachusetts Educational 
Assessment program were above the state median (with reading and science scores 
above our own "comparison score band"). Grade 3 Basic Skills test results were 
above 96 percent in all areas. 

The Friends of Doyon, our parent support group, continues to provide the special 
assistance that makes grand things possible. To them we owe the success of the 
Book Swap, the Assembly Programs, the Million Minutes and the Playwright in 
Residence project. They are a generous and a joyful group, and we want to be 
sure that they know how much we value their involvement. 

As Principal I continue to feel especially fortunate to be working with a dedi- 
cated and talented faculty in a community that cares about education. It was a 
super year, and the future looks bright. 



-62- 



******** 



WINTHROP SCHOOL 

M. Rebecca van der Bogert, Principal 

The calendar year 1989 has shown all of us at the Winthrop School the benefits 
that can be reaped from a strong working relationship among parents, staff, and 
students. Our students have been the recipients of both active teacher par- 
ticipation and parent involvement. 

Parents have contributed through many organizations. The Friends of Winthrop 
have met on a monthly basis to hear presentations on educational issues, they 
provide daily support to teachers, and have sponsored the annual Jogathon and 
Ice Cream Social. Our Parent Forum has met monthly to discuss concerns that 
arise and to brainstorm waysof improving our school. The Volunteers In Schools 
has been successful again this year and continues to assist us with 42 parents 
working closely with classroom teachers to provide students that extra boost. 
We've also been able to expand the number of students involved in our parent 
organized Great Books Reading program. Once again our students have been 
exposed to high level performances through the efforts of our Special Program 
Committee. 

Thanks' to a major fundraiser that was organized by parents, we've turned our 
cafeteria into a Gallery and performing area which will be open to the public. 
This fundraiser also helped us move toward networking with other schools and 
teaching our students about telecommunications. 

Our teachers have been deeply involved in the learning process themselves. As 
we move to prepare our students for the year 2000, our staff has been attending 
workshops, taking courses, and reading avidly about the latest teaching strate- 
gies, curriculum changes, and projects about the future for our students. We've 
been refining the work we did last year on our writing program, are in the pro- 
cess of developing a literature based reading approach, and are working inten- 
sely on teaching our students mathematical problem solving through a Math Their 
Way Program. 

All of us at the Winthrop School approach 1990 with a sense of accomplishment 
about 1989. We have an awareness that the challenge to educate our students for 
the future is a monumental one, but one that we are looking forward to with a 
sense of togetherness, hard work, and excitement. 



******** 



IPSWICH MIDDLE SCHOOL 
Barry W. Hopping, Principal 

In September of 1988, we opened our doors to 317 students in grades 6, 7, and 8. 
In recent years where declining enrollments have been an on-going concern, it 
was an encouraging sign to welcome 117 sixth graders to our school. Due in 
large part to a "move up" day the previous spring and a sixth grade orientation 
for students and parents held in August, the year began for our new academicians 
with nary a hitch. 



-63- 



The 1988-1989 school year was also witness to several exciting events here at 
the Ipswich Middle School. In keeping with middle school philosophy, emphasis 
was on inter-disciplinary units in all three grades. Perhaps most indicative of 
this approach was the "Science and Art of the Sea" project, a series of marine 
studies workshops designed for our sixth and seventh graders. Among the in- 
school of off-site activities our students participated in were mapping and 
navigation, literature of the sea, and a study of the future of ocean resources. 
Students were made to realize the importance of teamwork and cooperative 
learning as they delved into "real world" issues. 

Our Media Center has remained on the "cutting edge" of advanced educational 
technology. During the past year, laser disk instruction has been introduced 
with the purchase of a laser disk player and math disks for all three grades. 
We've also updated our extensive research reference section with the purchase of 
an ACD ROM player which, when connected to the Macintosh computer, provides on- 
line searching through Grolier's Academic American Encyclopedia. 

Students received a great deal of special recognition in the areas of art, 
music, and athletics. In art, we were well represented in the Scholastic Art 
Contest sponsored by the Boston Globe. Our chorus and band students were widely 
praised for their performances around town and at several area malls during the 
holidays. Our athletic teams were all competitive and represented the school 
with tremendous pride and enthusiasm. 

Community relations was also an area of continued growth and strength. Our very 
active parents' organization assisted in the planning and organizing of various 
special events. Our student council not only coordinated a food drive for needy 
families in town, but also orchestrated a program which allowed students to 
visit the Caldwell Nursing Home and help with the patients there. The nuturing 
of goodwill among our students and other members of the community remained a 
high priority for us. Overall, the relationships we have developed as a result 
of these commitments have shown our students the importance of positive involve- 
ment with those requiring support and constant encouragement. 

In conclusion, we would like to thank the community for their continued support 
in our quest to provide quality programs for our students. We appreciate what- 
ever assistance our townspeople can offer. The future success of our school 
depends on the combined efforts of everyone; the need to work together has never 
been more urgent! 

******** 

IPSWICH HIGH SCHOOL 

Stephen M. Fortado, Principal 

I am pleased to submit my fifth annual report to the citizens of Ipswich. 

The 1988-89 school year began with 407 students enrolled in grades nine through 
twelve. One hundred freshmen replaced the one hundred and twenty-one seniors 
who graduated on June 11. We hope we have reached the lowest point in 
enrollments. We should see a gradual increase beginning in two years. 

One of the highlights of the school year was the visit to Ipswich High School by 
Dr. Rita Dunn, Director of the Center for the Study of Learning and Teaching 
Styles at St. John's University, New York. Dr. Dunn conducted a day-long workshop 



■64- 



for the high school faculty on individual student learning styles. Her instruc- 
tional insights generated considerable interest among our teachers. Four 
teachers went to New York in February for intensive training and came back eager 
to share with their colleagues. We administered individual learning style 
diagnostic tests to all of our students and shared the results with students, 
teachers, and parents. Many students have been able to make significant adjust- 
mentsin the way they study because of their knowledge of their individual 
learning styles. Several teachers have made adjustments in their teaching style 
to more effectively reach their students. We will continue to use learning styles 
information to help students and teachers increase their effectiveness. 

In May, thirty-three of our students took Advance Placement exams in eight dif- 
ferent subjects: Art History, Biology, Calculus, English Literature and 
Composition, French Language, Physics, Spanish Language, and U. S. History. We 
were delighted to learn that Ipswich High School students scored higher than the 
Massachusetts and national averages in seven of the eight areas. Kudos were in 
order for our students and their teachers. 

An important era came to end when Assistant Principal Charles McKenzie retired 
in June after thirty-one years of service at Ipswich High School. His many 
friends wished him well at a retirement banquet held in May at the Hawthorne 
Hotel . He will be mi ssed. 

I wish to express my sincere appreciation to the students, parents, and citizens 
of Ipswich for their continued support of our efforts to provide quality educa- 
tion for all the students of Ipswich High School. 

******** 

DEPARTMENT OF SPECIAL SERVICES 
Elizabeth J. Geanakakis, Director 

Department goals during the 1988-89 school year focused on the measure of the 
effectiveness and quality of the Ipswich Public Schools' services to identified 
special needs students. 

A very thorough evaluation of the Special Services was conducted by an outside 
agency. The resultant commendations and recommendations were valuable for con- 
tinued growth in quality of service and in planning. 

During the 1988-89 school year, the following took place: 

Number of: 

New referrals for Team Evaluation 79 
Team Evaluations that resulted in new or 

continued placement 60 

Team Evaluations that resulted in NO placement 19 
Team Re-Evaluation of Individual Student Programs 97 

Annual Review of Individual Student Programs 156 



Screening of 



3 year olds 38 

4 year olds 35 
Kindergarten 138 



Total number of Special Needs Students serviced in 1988-89 318 

Number of Special Needs Students completing program goals 42 

Number of Special Needs Students graduating 9 

-65- 



The Department received the following entitlement grants for which we must apply 
each year: 

Title VI B 94-142 $74,790.00 

Title I 89-313 $11,050.00 

Early Childhood $9,450.00 

English as Second Language $728.00 

In addition: 

Our Chapter 188 Early Childhood Grant 

was again funded for: $71,167.00 

A Special Net Computer Research 

and Communication Grant was funded 

for: $700.00 

Surveys were conducted on: 

1. The regular staff use of Individual Education Plans. 

2. Equalization of services between schools. 

3. Responsibilities of regular and special needs teachers when co-teaching 
an integrated class. 

4. Special Needs graduates and present position. 

5. Sex equity in education. 

5. Staff perceptions and areas of proposed staff personal growth. 

******** 

TOWN CLERK 

Isobel N. Coulombe 

1989 Population: 12,534 

Comparative Vital Statistics recorded in the past four years: 

1986 1987 1988 1989 
Births 
Deaths 
Marriages 

There were 66 females and 70 males born to Ipswich residents in 1989. Of the 
total number of deaths recorded (53 females, 51 males), 104 were resident; 
the oldest resident was 99, and youngest was 16 years old. Of the 100 marriages 
recorded in Ipswich, 29 took place elsewhere; in 14 marriages, one party was a 
non-resident and in 30 marriages, both parties were non-resident. 

DOG LICENSES 1987 1988 1989 

Males 

Females 

Spayed Females 

Kennels 



-66- 



136 


139 


135 


136 


131 


128 


117 


104 


107 


104 


91 


100 



661 


596 


626 


60 


57 


66 


581 


498 


529 


26 


22 


32 


1328 


1173 


1253 



128 


137 


84 


71 


32 


41 


14 


17 


41 


36 


16 


8 














326 


310 



The 1989 Census found 1372 dogs in Ipswich. 

SHELLFISH LICENSES & PERMITS 1988 1989 

Resident Yearly 

Resident Fami ly 

Resident Commercial 

"Over 60" Resident Recreational 

Non-resident Yearly 

Non-resident Daily 

Non-resident Commercial 

Non-resident Commercial Rack Tickets 



TOWN ELECTIONS: 

The Annual Meeting for the Election of Town Officers was held in accordance with 
the Warrant on Monday, April 10, 1989, from 10:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m. The ballot 
box in Precinct 1 registered 297 ballots cast; in Precinct 2, 261; in Precinct 3, 
264; in Precinct 4, 276, for a total of 1098 votes cast in the four precincts, 
out of a total of 7421 registered voters. 

******** 

TOWN COUNSEL 
Charles C. Dalton 

The year 1989 was an unusually active year for the Town's Legal Department. The 
Town purchased two parcels of real estate and used its eminent domain power to 
acquire drainage and related easements on several other parcels of property. 

Among the real estate which the Town acquired during 1989 was a 2.4 acre parcel 
on High Street, abutting the High School, for $162,500, and a 25 acre parcel 
near the Rowley town line for $100,000. It is expected that both properties 
will be kept in their natural state. 

In the litigation area, the Town prevailed in a prolonged Federal Civil Rights 
lawsuit brought in 1988 by the Viladenis family alleging that in 1982 the Town 
had violated the Viladenis' constitutional rights by its failure to maintain the 
Brown Square Extension in a manner acceptable to the Viladenises. The case was 
ultimately dismissed after substantial pre-trial proceedings. 

The Building Inspector, Planning Board, and Board of Appeals were involved in 
several lawsuits enforcing or defending the Zoning By-Law in regard to a multi- 
tude of properties throughout Town. A suit against the Selectmen as Sewer 
Commissioners which originated in 1983 and involved a proposed 32 unit con- 
dominium project on Mitchell Road was settled in principal during 1989. 

Most potential and actual legal disputes between Town Employees and Boards and 
various opposing parties were amicably resolved to the Town's satisfaction 
without resort to any judicial proceedings. 



-67- 



******** 



TREASURER/COLLECTOR 
Virginia M. Cleary 

The following bills were sent to taxpayers: 

Personal Property 
Real Estate 



Motor Vehicle Excise 
Boat Excise 



New cash registers were installed which have reduced the amount of time needed 
to process transactions and increased the accuracy of financial reporting. The 
department purchased a personal computer. Using a Lotus 1-2-3 program, we have 
interfaced the daily receipts with the various banks we do business with along 
with the Town Accountant's records. 



Interest earned on investments: 

Beach Stickers: 

Tax Title Redemption: 



$351,031.27 
11,196.00 
88,701.83 



A special thanks to Gloria Klimasewski, Joanna Lendh, Susan LeMieux 
William Handren for their continued support. 



and 



******** 



WATER/SEWER DEPARTMENTS 
James E. Chase, Engineer 

The following extensions were added to our distribution system in 1989 

Oakhill 

Greenspoint Road 
Colonial Drive 



200' ■ 


- 6" 


PVC 


300' - 


- 8" 


CLDI 


230' - 


- 8" 


PVC 



Water Division 

Charles Mantsourani, Filtration Superintendent 

Gilbert J. Elliott, Water Foreman 

1986 



1987 



1988 



Total Length of Mai ns 

Water Services 
Metered Services 
Unmetered Services 
Summer Services 



433,310 



441,010' 



462,760' 



1989 



New Meters Instal led 


46 


114 


76 


82 


Meters Replaced 


98 


109 


154 


181 


Services Turned Off 


11 


56 


98 


98 


Services Turned On 


118 


154 


135 


142 


New Services 


148 


76 


77 


58 


Services Discontinued 


2 


4 


3 


1 


Hydrants Installed 


31 


13 


29 


1 


Hydrants Replaced 





1 


3 


4 


New Water Mains Installed 


14,065' 


7,700' 


21,750' 


730 



563,490' 



3,662 


3,776 


3,852 


3,932 


70 


109 


94 


87 


71 


15 


15 






-68- 



Water Usage 
Dow 1 s Reservoir 
Brown's Well 
Winthrop Wells 
Mile Lane Well 
Essex Road Well 
Fel lows Road Well 
Total Water Usage 

Highest Day: 2/08/86 

Highest Day: 7/20/87 

Highest Day: 7/08/88 

Highest Day: 7/27/89 

Wastewater Division 



1986 

82,249,000 
76,932,000 
30,300,000 
18,574,000 
21,766,000 
28,139,000 
257,960,000 

1,523,000 



1987 

25,754,000 
103,760,000 
58,172,000 
30,781,000 
55,505,000 
45,702,000 
319,674,000 



2,413,000 



1988 

124,466,000 
91,946,000 
31,225,000 
21,617,000 
37,738,000 
40,356,000 



1989 

252,286,000 

31,072,000 

712,000 

6,557,000 

15,525,000 

19,479,000 



348,351,000 325,631,000 



2,004,000 



2,047,000 



Timothy J. Henry, S 


uperintendent 












Daily 


1986 


1987 


1988 


1989 


Wastewater Treated 










(Average Gallons) 




1,386,000 


1,145,000 


1,095,000 


952,000 


Total Wastewater Treated 










(Gallons) 




506.326 


417.925 


400.880 


347.630 


Septage (Gallons) 




242,400 


485,500 


681,390 


1,081,450 


Highest Dai ly Flow: 


4/20/86 


2,641,000 








Highest Dai ly Flow: 


4/06/87 




2 , 568 , 000 






Highest Dai ly Flow: 


2/20/88 






1,983,000 




Highest Daily Flow: 


4/16/89 








1,959,000 


Total Precipitation 


( Inches) 


50.85 


51.35 


39.10 


46.40 



Highest Daily Prec. 6/05/86 
Highest Daily Prec. 4/04/87 
Highest Daily Prec. 3/26/88 
Highest Daily Prec. 10/20/89 

Treatment 

Average Influent Suspended 

Sol ids mgl 
Average Effluent Suspended 

Sol ids mgl 
Average Percent Removal, S.S, 
Average Influent BOD5 mgl 
Average Effluent BOD5 mgl 
Average Percent Removal BOD5 
Average Effluent pH 

Sludge Dewateri ng 
Digested Sludge to Vacuum 

Filters (Gallons) 
Average Digested Sludge 

Percent Solids 
Vacuum Filter Sludge Cake to 

Disposal (Pounds) 
Average Vacuum Filter Sludge 

Cake % Solids 



2.85 



4.25 



81 



70 



2.30 



80 



1.80 



89 







3.6 




3.3 




6.7 


15 






96 




95 




92 


84 






135 




121 




135 


157 






8.6 




7.4 




9.3 


23 






94 




94 




93 


85 






6.9 




6.9 




7.0 


7.3 


2 


,348 


,300 


2,122 


,100 


2,056 


,000 


2,374,955 






2.2 




2.2 




1.9 


2.4 




425 


,688 


375 


,055 


318 


,551 


465,403 






11.8 




11.4 




11.0 


13.7 



-69- 



1986 1987 1988 1989 



Chemicals 










Disinfection: Total Chlorine 










(Pounds) 


7,836 


5,475 


5,602 


6,529 


Sludge Dewatering: 










Lime (Pounds) 


98,060 


86,958 


106,752 


124,642 


Ferric Chloride (Pounds) 


28,412 


25,454 


37,800 


35,866 


Collection System 










New Sewer Connections 


40 


25 


22 


13 


Total Sewer Connections 


1,464 


1,489 


1,511 


1,524 



The following extensions were added to our collection systems in 1989: 
High Street 731' - 8" PVC 

Colonial Drive 733' - 8" PVC 
Haywood Street 275' - 10" PVC 

******** 

WHITTIER REGIONAL VOCATIONAL TECHNICAL HIGH SCHOOL 
Richard M. Kay, Superintendent Director 
Eugene A. Hailson, Ipswich Representative 

Whittier Regional Vocational Technical High School is entering its seventeenth 
year. To date, we have graduated 4440 students from a regular day school 
program and 672 students from our post secondary courses. 

In accordance with the provisions of the School Improvement Law (Chapter 188), 
Whittier has accomplished the following: 

1. The School Improvement Council 

The School Improvement Council comprised of administrators, teachers, 
parents, and students has met and will be recommending projects using 
grant monies in the amount of $2,751.00. 

2. Horace Mann Grant 

Progress is ongoing in three projects approved by the School Committee 
for teachers to develop various proposals which could result in student 
benefit: A Newsletter for the Freshmen, a Project on Drug and Alcohol 
Abuse Problems, and a continuation of the Computer Software Evaluation 
Process. 

Prior Horace Mann Grants are being implemented in Public Relations 
publications, curriculum updates/revisions, computer facilities and 
software. 

Recently Whittier Regional has implemented procedures, installed systems, 
modified existing systems and devices, and is proceeding with the remainder of 
over $540,000 in energy grants. The measures involved are savings of energy 
through exhaust air heat recover, room and shop air circulation systems, 
lighting fixtures and lamp replacement, sawdust recovery filters and heated air 
recirculation, and conversion to gas energy alternatives. These measures have 
enabled the school to decrease its energy needs and, therefore, result in 
savings to the communities. 



-70- 



Whittier Regional has recently processed an update to the New England 
Association of Schools and Colleges school accreditation, and recommendations 
have been implemented. 

Whittier Regional has recently successfully undergone an extensive State 
Department Chapter 74 audit. This audit involves an on-site visitation by a 
team of experts with specialty in vocational program areas and curriculums and 
has resulted in continuing program approval and state and federal funding. 



DAY SCHOOL PROGRAMS: 

Auto Body 

Auto Repair 

Basic Electronics 

Carpentry 

Cabinetmaking 
House Building 

Commercial Art 

Cosmetology 

Culinary Arts 

Data Processing 

Design Marketing 

Diesel Machine 

Distributive Education 



EVENING SCHOOL OFFERINGS: 
Trade Extension Classes: 

Electrical 

Plumbi ng 

Construction Licensing 

Auto Body Apprai sal 

Oil Burner Technician 
Trade Preparatory: 

Air Conditioni ng 

Auto Body 

Boat Building 

CAD Drafting 

Carpentry 

Machine Shop 

Trowel Trades 

Welding 

Word Processing 



Drafting 
Electrical 

Fashion/Interior Design 
Food Services 
Graphic Communications 
Health Careers 
Interior Design Aide 
Machine Shop 
Plumbing and Heating 
Satellite Program 
Sheet Metal 
Special Needs 
Trowel Trades 
Welding 



Evening Practical Arts: 
Auto Repair 

Baking and Culinary Arts 
Carpentry 
Chair Caning 

Draperies & Window Dressing 
Lawn Mower-Snowblower, small 

engine tune-ups 
Mixology 
Quilti ng 

Sheet Metal & Metal Fabrication 
Shorthand 

Silversmith & Jewelry 
Uphol stery 



The enrollment for the Evening School from your community: 6 
The October 1, 1988 Day School Enrollment: 

Girl 

Total 29 

Post Secondary 

1989 Graduates 7 

The cost to your community for the school year 1988-89 was $108,885.00. 



Grade 9 


7 Boys 


1 


Grade 10 





1 


Grade 11 


8 


4 


Grade 12 


6 


2 



-71- 



********* 



ZONING BOARD OF APPEALS 

James Theodosopoulos, Chairman 

In 1989, 92 petitions were presented to the Zoning Board of Appeals. There were 
65 requests for Special Permits, of which 62 were granted. There were 18 
requests for Variances, of which four were granted. There were five appeals, of 
which two were affirmed, three reversed. Four petitions were withdrawn or 
di smi ssed. 

During the year, Bill Murphy was re-appointed as a regular member for a five-year 
term. John Verani and Joseph R. Petranek were re-appointed as associate members 
for a one-year term. Also during the year, Doug Denninger resigned; Dana Jordan 
was appointed as his replacement. Jim Theodosopoulos was re-elected chairman. 



TOWN OF IPSWICH 
REVENUE SHARING HANDICAPPED REGULATIONS 

This notice is published pursuant to the requirements of Section 51.55 of the 
Revenue Sharing Regulations, as published in the Federal Register on October 17, 
1983. Section 51.55 prohibits discrimination against qualified individuals 
because of their handicapped status. 

The Town of Ipswich, Massachusetts, advises the public, employees and job appli- 
cants that it does not discriminate on the basis of handicapped status in 
admission or access to, or treatment or employment in, its programs and 
activities. 

The Town of Ipswich has designated the following (person or office) as the con- 
tact to coordinate efforts to comply with this requirement. Inquiries should be 
directed to: 

Name: George E. Howe 
Office: Town Manager 
Address: Town Hall, South Main Street 
Phone Number: (508)356-4848 

Hours: 8 a.m. - 7 p.m. Mondays 

8 a.m. - 4 p.m. Tues.-Thurs. 
8 a.m. - 12 noon Fridays 



-72- 



TRUSTEES OF THE IPSWICH PUBLIC LIBRARY 
STATEMENT OF FUND ACTIVITY 

July 1, 1988 to June 30, 1989 



I. BOOK FUND AND MEMORIAL FUNDS 
Balance - July 1, 1988 

Contributions : 

Interest Income: 

Expenditures : 

Books (853.00) 
Other (865.00) 

Balance - June 30, 1989 



$14,108.72 

134.00 
1,128.64 



(1,718.00) 
$13,653.36 



II. IPSWICH SPEAKS FUND 

Balance - July 1, 1988 

Interest Income: 
Balance - June 30, 1989 



$ 1,003.98 

94.06 

$ 1,098.04 



III. LIBRARY TRUST FUND 

Balance Received July 1, 1988 

Expenditures : 

Architect's Fees 
(Expansion Plans) 
Grant Request Fees 



Interest Income 

Balance - June 30, 1989 

Augustine Heard Fund 
Elizabeth R. Lathrop Fund 
Adelade B. Lockhart Fund 
Abby L. Newman Fund 
George Spiller Fund 
Daniel Treadwell Fund 



($16,743.00) 
( 2,512.00) 



$11,894.12 

1,240.18 

607.31 

3,695.27 

1,040.00 

26,611.06 



$58,151.34 



( 19,255.00) 
6,191.60 



$45,087.94 



-73- 



FEOFFEES OF THE GRAMMAR SCHOOL 
IPSWICH, MASSACHUSETTS 



Balance, July 1, 1988 
Cash Received 
Expenditures 
Balance, June 30, 1989 



14,187.02 
284,829.67 
285,534.03 

13,482.66 



Little Neck, Land Valuation 
Buildings - Community Center & Barn 
Cash in First National Bank of Ipswich 
On Deposit - Ipswich Co-operative Bank 
On Deposit - Ipswich Savings Bank 



18^58,700.00 

75,600.00 

13,482.66 

2,000.00 

1.336.16 



5.455.674.99 



SCHEDULE I 
CASH RECEIPTS 



Tuly 1,1988 
Building & Land Taxes 
Rents 
Late Payment Interest & Miscellaneous 



Tune 30, 1989 



209,032.67 

74,600.00 

1,197.00 



SCHEDULE A 
RECONCILIATION OF CASH RECEIPTS 
Balance, July 1, 1988 
Cash Receipts - Schedule I 

Expenditures - Schedule II 



14,187.02 
284.829.67 
299.016.69 
285.534.03 

13,482.66 



-74- 



SCHEDULE II 
EXPENDITURES 

Tuly 1,1988 - Tune 30, 1989 
Taxes 

Town of Ipswich 216,766.40 

Repairs & Upkeep 

Water 15,302.62 

Wharf & Docks 1,897.42 

Playgrounds 1,930.00 

Tree Work 7,390.25 

Maintenance 2,122.29 

Road - Hot topping & Repair 8,666.74 

Salaries & Expenses 

Salaries 5,500.00 

Transportation 500.00 

Police 3,763.02 

Office Supplies 164.00 

Meetings 323.98 

Telephone 229.39 

Insurance 17,984.12 

Legal 2,793.80 

Miscellaneous Refund 200.00 

285,534.03 



-75- 



BURLEY EDUCATION FUND 
Balance on hand January 1, 1989 $28,898.55 

Income from funds for year 1989 as follow: 
Interest: Ipswich Co-Operative Bank 

Money Market Certificate $ 2,767.31 

Balance on hand January 1, 1990 as follows: 

Ipswich Co-Operative Bank Money Market Certificate $31,665.86 



-76- 



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5 ^ 



■86- 



TOWN OF IPSWICH, MASSACHUSETTS 

NOTES TO FINANCIAL STATEMENTS 

June 30, 1989 

Summary of Significant Accounting Polices 

The accounting policies for financial reporting purposes of 
the Town of Ipswich conform to generally accepted accounting 
principles for local governmental units except as indicated 
in note 2. 

A. Fund Accounting 

The Town reports its financial activities in several 
funds and one account group in order to comply with the 
limitations and restrictions placed on both the re- 
sources made available to the Town and services pro- 
vided. The various funds are grouped in the financial 
statements in this report into six generic fund types 
and three broad fund categories as follows: 

GOVERNMENTAL FUNDS 

General Fund 

The general fund is the general operating fund of the 

Town. It is used to account for all financial resources 

except those required to be accounted for in another 

fund. 

Special Revenue Fund - General Revenue Sharing 
This special revenue fund is used to account for the 
proceeds of the State and Local Fiscal Assistance Act 
and their expenditures as prescribed by the Office of 
Federal Revenue Sharing. 

Special Revenue Funds - Other 

This special revenue fund is used to account for the pro- 
ceeds of specific revenue resources (other than general 
revenue sharing, expendable trusts of major capital pro- 
jects) that are legally restricted to expenditures for 
specified purposes. 

Capital Projects Fund 

The capital projects funds are used to account for 
financial resources to be used for the acquisition or 
construction of major facilites (other than those 
financed by proprietary funds and trust funds) . 

PROPRIETARY FUND 

Sewer - Water - Electric Funds 

Sewer, water, and electric funds are used to account for 
operations (a) that are financed and operated in a manner 
similar to private business enterprises - where the in- 
tent of the governing body is that the costs of providing 



■87- 



goods or services to the general public on a' continuing 
basis be financed or recovered primarily through user 
charges; or (b) where the governing body has decided 
that periodic determination of revenue earned, expenses 
incurred, and/or net income is appropriate for capital 
maintenance, public policy, management control, account- 
ability, or other purposes where all financial transactions 
are maintained as separate funds - namely, Sewer Fund, 
Water Fund, Electric Fund. 

FIDUCIARY FUNDS 

Trust and Agency Funds 

Trust and agency funds are used to account for assets held 
by the Town in a trustee capacity or as an agent for 
individuals, private organizations, other governments 
and/or other funds. These include expendable trust, non- 
expendable trust and agency funds. Nonexpendable trust 
funds are accounted for in a manner that permits the 
periodic measurement of revenue earned, expenses in- 
curred and/or net income in order to demonstrate main- 
tenace of capital. Expendable trust funds are accounted 
for in essentially the same manner as governmental funds. 
Agency funds are custodial in nature (assets equal liabilities) 
and do not involve measurement of results of operations. 

ACCOUNT GROUP 

Long-Term Debt and Liabilities - Long-Term liabilites expected 
to be financed from governmental funds are accumulated in 
the general long-term debt group of accounts. This account 
group is not a fund. It is only concerned with the measure- 
ment of financial position and therefore, is not involved 
with a measurement of the results from any operation. 

B. Basis of Accounting 

The accompanying financial statements, except for the 
enterprise funds as noted below, have been prepared prin- 
cipally on the modified accrual basis of accounting. This 
method recognizes revenues when they become measurable and 
available. Expenses are recognized under this method as 
they are incurred. 

The accompanying financial statements of the enterprise fund 
have been prepared and presented on the accrual basis of 
accounting. Under this method, revenues are recognized in 
the accounting period in which they are earned and expenses 
are recognized when the related liability is incurred. 



-88- 



Revenue Recognition 

Property tax revenues are recognized as revenue when they 
become available. Available means then due, or past due 
and receivable within the current period, or expected to be 
collected soon enough thereafter to be used to pay liabilities 
of the current period. 

All other revenues are recognized throughout the year when 
cash is received. Receipts during the sixty days 
immediately following the close of the fiscal year are also 
recognized as available revenue. 

In applying the susceptible to accrual concept to inter- 
governmental revenues, the legal and contractual re- 
quirements of the numerous individual programs re used 
as guidance. There are, however, essectially two types 
of these revenues. In one, monies must be expected on the 
specific purpose or projuct before any amounts will be paid 
to the Town, therefore, revenues are recognized based upon 
the expenditures recorded. In the other, monies are virt- 
ually unrestricted as to purpose of expenditures and are 
usually revocable only for failure to comply with pre- 
scribed compliance requirements. These resources are re- 
flected as revenues at the time of receipt or earlier if the 
susceptible to accrual criteria is met. 

Expenses 

Expenditures are recorded during the year ona cash dis- 
bursement basis. In addition, as required by Massachusetts 
General Laws, disbursements made during the fifteen days 
immediately following the close of each fiscal year and 
which pertain to the prior year are recorded as expenses as 
of June 30th. 

Purchase orders outstanding at June 30th related to annual 
operating expenses are recorded as encumbrances and, accord- 
ingly, as a reservation of fund balances at the date. 

GAAP Basis Amounts - Property taxes on the combined state- 
ment of revenues and expenditures - budget and actual - 
general and revenue sharing funds (exhibit 3) has been 
stated in accordance with interpretation number 3 issued by 
the National Council on Governmental Accounting. 

2. Departures from Generally Accepted Accounting Principles 

During 1981, the Commonwealth of Massachusetts issued a revised 
uniform municipal accounting system entitles "U.M.A.S." The de- 
partures from G.A.A.F. under this revised system have been 
significantly narrowed. The Town has adopted the revised uniform 
municipal accounting system entitled U.M.A.S. since 1981. 



-89- 



The significant departures from G.A.A.P. included in the 
Town of Ipswich's financial statements are: 

A. Retirement benefits are provided for on a "pay-as-you 
go" basis rather than a acceptable actuarial cost 
method (note 8) . 

B. General fund fixed asset acquisitions are recorded as 
expenditures at the time purchases are made rather 
than being capitalized in a general fixed asset group 
of accounts. 

C. Purchases for materials and supplies inventories are 
recorded as expenditures rather than assets at the 
time of purchase. 

3. Provision for Property Tax Abatements and Exemptions 
Provision for property tax abatements and exemptions are 
established for each annual tax levy as prescribed by 
statue. The primary intent is to provide for these po- 
tential refunds or allowances during the year in which the 
tax would otherwise be due and collected. Excessive amounts 
no longer necessary are transferred to fund balance reserved 
for extraordinary or unforseen expenses as prescribed by the 
Massachusetts General Laws. 

4. Reserve for Extraordinary or Unforeseen Expenses 

The balance in this account represents the transfer of 
excess amounts from the"Provision for Abatement and 
Exemption" accounts. This account was previously known or 
classified as "Overlay Surplus" to be appropriated by the 
town meeting vote for extraordinary or unforseen expenses in 
accordance with Chapter 59, Section 25, Massachusetts 
General Laws. 

5. Reserve for Encumbrances 

The balance in this account is made up of current and prior 
years unexpended appropriations carried forward. 

6. Unreserved Fund Balances - Designated 

Certain budgetary surplus and deficits must, according to 
the General Laws of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, be 
utilized to reduce or be raised in the next subsequent tax 
rate. These items have been included within the unreserved 
fund balance pursuant to G.A.A.P. 

State and County over/underassessment, net, result from an 
excess of amounts raised in the tax levy of the current year 
as compared to the actual expenditures made for such purposes 
These amounts will be utilized to reduce the 1990 tax levy. 

Appropriation deficits resulted from expenditures of the 
accounts listed that exceed their appropriation during the 
fiscal year. 



-90- 



7 . Pension Plans 

Substantially, all employees of the Town, except school 
teachers and certain other school department employees 
are members of the Essex County Retirement System. The 
pension plan provides retirement benefits for members 
who have attained a certain age and for periods of service. 
Members contribute certain percentages of their salaries or 
wages to the plan. In addition, the Massachusetts Division of 
Insurance determined an amount, each year, that the Town 
must contribute to the system in order to meet that year's 
projected benefit payment. 

This so called "pay-as-you-go" method does not provide for 
the funding of any unfunded liabilities that might exist as 
a result of an actuarial determination of the fiscal con- 
dition of the plan. The amount of the unfunded liability 
of the Essex County Retirement System is actuarialy deter- 
mined periodically and reported to the Town of Massachusetts 
Retirement Law Commission. The most recent actuarial valuation 
was prepared as of January 01, 1979. At that date, the act- 
uarialy computed value of unfunded pension benefits attrib- 
utable to the Town of Ipswich amounted to $5,856,650. 

Teachers and certain administrative employees of the School 
Department participate in a contributory retirement plan 
administered by the Massachusetts Teachers' Retirement Board. 
The Town does not contribute to this plan. 

8. Unemployment Compensation 

The Town is on the reimbursable method for paying unem- 
ployment compensation. Under the reimbursable method, the 
Massachusetts Employment Security Division sends a list 
quarterly to the community of who has received benefits. 
The community then reimburses the Massachusetts Employment 
Security Division for these clients against the Town. 

9. Workmen's Compensation 

The Town insures its workers with Utica National Insurance 
Company, which computed its premium by estimating the Town's 
payroll and utilizing the- rates per hundred established by 
the State Division of Insurance. 

10. Vacation and Sick Pav 



Employees earn vacation and sick leave as they provide services 
Vacation accumulation is limited to the current year. Sick 
leave accumulates for various groups of employees based upon 
the respective collection bargaining agreements. Sick leave 
accumulates at the rate of one and one-quarter days per month. 
Maximum sick leave accumulation is 150 days for firefighters, 
165 days for policemen, and 165 days for all other town em- 
ployees. The cost of vacation and sick leave benefits is 
accounted for as an operation expenditure of the general fund, 
when paid. Sick leave benefits are paid only when taken and, 
therefore, not paid to employees upon termination. 

11 . Summary of Long-Term Dept 

A summary of the Long-Term Debt is presented below: 

See Schedule II 



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IPSWICH PUBLIC LIBRARY 









3 2122 00166 245 5 





Ipswich Station 

Built by the Eastern Railroad - 1881 
Torn down - 1959 



Photo by Richard Sanborn 



Ipswich, Massachusetts 1839-1989 
150 Years of Railroad Service